News

No more ‘hot bed’ hanky panky, says council

Coal communities advocate Jim Pearce welcomed the council's stance on mine worker's accommodation.
Coal communities advocate Jim Pearce welcomed the council's stance on mine worker's accommodation. Chris Ison

THE resource industry's practice of "hot bedding" will not be tolerated by the Central Highlands council in any new non-resident FIFO or DIDO workforce accommodation.

In its newly released policy statement, the council has actively promoted a "one key, one room" approach with individual workers afforded some privacy and comfort.

"I congratulate the council for finally having the courage to stand up to these big accommodation camp developers," coal communities advocate Jim Pearce said.

"Someone should be making sure the workers have accommodation that is quality accommodation that they can call their own while they're on the job."

 

File

"Council is supportive of accommodation that is designed and constructed to provide non-resident workers a single room for the duration of their employment," the policy states.

 

"This approach encourages a sense of community and ownership by these workers.

"To remove any doubt, council does not support in any circumstances the practice of 'hot bedding' whereby employees/contractors share a room for the duration of their shifts of employment."

All camp applications will now be assessed by councillors, with no delegated approvals to be ticked off.

The downside for camp developers could be the doubling of room numbers to comply with the policy, alongside the demand for high quality construction in urban areas.

"There is broad agreement that 'hot bedding' is a dying practice at the hands of worker preferences," an industry source said.

"People will simply not take jobs under such conditions - a point confirmed strongly in the 2012 QRC Workforce Accommodation Survey of 2300 sector workers."

Mr Pearce claimed mining companies had enjoyed years of "ripping off taxpayers" through the use of FIFO and DIDO employees.

"It appears that for accommodation, travel and food, the mining companies are allowed to claim tax benefits under the fringe benefits tax," he said.

"The people I know that are doing the hot bedding are quite fed up with it because they have to unload everything at the end of the shift into their car and then bring it back."

Central Highlands Mayor Peter Maguire said the policy was drawn up to give all parties the clearest of guidelines.

The policy also covers camps for the rural sector, public and civil works and construction, and emergency accommodation.


Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Isaac wins national backing to end postcode discrimination

Isaac Regional Council Mayor Anne Baker Photo Contributed

Isaac wins national backing to end postcode discrimination

Who you gonna call Central Highlands?

Scott Mason, CEO of Central Highlands Regional Council. Emerald. Photo Di Stanley / CQ News

Call 133 242 686 for all your council enquiries

Search for a star begins on the Highlands

Kaye, Chelsy, Angelie, Nikki and Kate of the Emerald Philipines Australian Association performed at the Central Highlands Multicultural Festival. Photo Amber Hooker / CQ News

2016 marks 12th annual Central Highlands Multicultural Festival

Latest deals and offers

Anything goes show promised for Emerald

FRESH after the Maroons triumph last week, New South Welshman and comedy duo ‘Fletch and Hindy’ picked a bad weekend to grace Emerald.

Searching for stolen items

Police are asking anyone with information on the stolen trailer to contact them.

Anyone with information on stolen bikes and trailer to come forward.

Isaac wins national backing to end postcode discrimination

Isaac Regional Council Mayor Anne Baker Photo Contributed

Isaac wins national backing to end postcode discrimination

Who you gonna call Central Highlands?

Scott Mason, CEO of Central Highlands Regional Council. Emerald. Photo Di Stanley / CQ News

Call 133 242 686 for all your council enquiries

Rio Tinto to pay $24,000 for refusing to pay sick leave

Rio Tinto’s Hail Creek Coal mine west of Mackay.

Rio Tinto has been ordered to pay $24,000 to the CFMEU.

Search for a star begins on the Highlands

Kaye, Chelsy, Angelie, Nikki and Kate of the Emerald Philipines Australian Association performed at the Central Highlands Multicultural Festival. Photo Amber Hooker / CQ News

2016 marks 12th annual Central Highlands Multicultural Festival

Ernie Els dunks for eagle

Smooth swing, great shot.

Ernie Els lives up to his reputation for one of the best swings in golf.

Jay Leno in spectacular rollover

Car flips after wheelie stunt.

Jay Leno gets more than he expected when he rides along in a 2500 HP Barracuda.

John Oliver on Brexit

John Oliver tries to explain the Brexit result.

John Oliver explains the fallout from Brexit on Last Week Tonight.

Three bedroom, 1100sqm block: Is this Qld's cheapest home?

BARGAIN BUY: Is this North Bundaberg property the cheapest home in Queensland?

Becoming a real estate mogul is all about risk and reward

PROPERTY BOOM: Coast prices set to skyrocket

Like other areas in south-east Queensland, the Sunshine Coast is at the start of the upturn on the property clock.

Values predicted to rise 25-33%