Abbott unlikely to pursue double dissolution

WHILE Prime Minister Tony Abbott is unlikely to pursue a double dissolution, after being handed the trigger on Wednesday, the prospect will likely add fuel to coming budget negotiations with a hostile Senate.

The Senate on Wednesday, for the second time, rejected the government's bills to abolish the $10 billion Clean Energy Finance Corporation, with Labor and The Greens taunting the government to call an election.

That second rejection of the same legislation allows for a double dissolution election to be called in some circumstances.

But with the government six points behind Labor in Tuesday's Newspoll, and record 17% for independents and minor parties, the prospect is unlikely to eventuate.

After the Senate rejected the abolition laws, Treasurer Joe Hockey released a statement saying Labor and The Greens were defying the will of the people, who voted to abolish the carbon tax.

The CEFC funds renewable energy projects on condition there is a return to the government, and was part of the Gillard government's carbon tax package.

But the rejection of the bills will heighten growing tensions on the crossbench, as six new Senators prepare to enter the fray in July - the positions of most of whom on the CEFC are unclear.

The government now has only one week and one day of sittings left to pass its crucial budget measures before the changeover.


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