DIFFERENT APPROACH: Maryborough High teacher Kaye North with an example of the augmented reality program she uses in her class.
DIFFERENT APPROACH: Maryborough High teacher Kaye North with an example of the augmented reality program she uses in her class. Alistair Brightman

Augmented reality gives students new mode of expression

FOR Year 7 teacher Kaye North, getting her students to listen is half the battle.

To get her students to better engage with her lessons, she has turned her Maryborough State High School classroom into an "augmented reality" hub, using a projector, a green screen, an iPad and an app.

The set-up works by converting 2D designs and drawings into 3D images.

Kaye's students use the set-up to create their own 3D worlds and designs for assignments, in a way which Kaye said benefited students who weren't so strong in reading and writing.

"It's a very hands-on, practical way of learning," Kaye said.

"Rather than simply writing down their ideas, it's an alternative way for the kids to express what they've come up with."

Kaye presented her way of teaching to a conference of more than 800 teachers from across the globe.

She said she was surprised how many other teachers were interested in her way of teaching.

"It's part of the future of teaching, I think," she said.

"And it can be used from Prep to Grade 12 and even university."

The annual National FutureSchools Expo & Conference was held in Sydney on March 3 and was attended by about 2300 teachers from all around Australia and New Zealand.

"It was exciting to see how other teachers use digital systems to teach their kids, too," she said.


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