DISGRUNTLED Cameby residents are taking action in the wake of increased wild dog attacks on their livestock.

The Cameby Feral Pest Control Group was formed about two months ago and, with nearly 30 members already on the books, is quickly gaining momentum.

"Dogs are the main issue, they can do a lot of destruction," CFPCG spokeswoman Carole Perkins said.

"And it's not only sheep they're pulling down but cattle as well."

The group has hired the services of an experienced dog trapper in an attempt to curb the damage.

Each new member pays a joining fee of $300 and the trapper is then paid for every dog he catches.

"We only have little properties so losing one head of sheep or a beast reduces profitability," Mrs Perkins said.

"A couple of years ago we lost 25 goats in one night."

Councillor Greg Olm, who helped the group get off the ground, said it was good to see residents being proactive about the issue.

"The response they've seen has been fantastic," he said.

"Anyone who's seen the devastation dogs do will know it's not very pretty when they rip up sheep and leave them there to die."

While it won't contribute any direct money to the CFPCG, Cr Olm said the council would support the group in applying for the available Federal Government funding.

Cr Olm accepted that baiting programs "weren't for everyone".

"It needs to be done on an area-by-area basis," he said.


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