Clermont State High School Year 8 students took part in the “Energy: The Inside Story” workshop on March 17, hosted by Queensland Minerals and Energy Academy to give students an inside look at the Australian energy market.
Clermont State High School Year 8 students took part in the “Energy: The Inside Story” workshop on March 17, hosted by Queensland Minerals and Energy Academy to give students an inside look at the Australian energy market.

Clermont students expand knowledge on QLD’s future energy mix

Central Queensland students have been the first to take part in a new Queensland Minerals and Energy Academy (QMEA) program, providing an inside look at Australia’s energy sources.

About 35 Year 8 students from Clermont State High School participated in the “Energy: The Inside Story” workshop on March 17.

“[The workshop] gives students an inside look at the Australian energy market and highlights how the NEM (National Energy Market) ensures that all Australians have access to reliable power when they need it,” Katrina-Lee Jones, Director Skills, Education and Training with the Queensland Resources Council (QRC) said.

“Students use live data from the AEMO (Australian Energy Market Operator), along with information about different energy production methods, to assist them in making decisions about the future energy mix for their state.”

Clermont State High School Year 8 students took part in the “Energy: The Inside Story” workshop on March 17.
Clermont State High School Year 8 students took part in the “Energy: The Inside Story” workshop on March 17.

The program was created to encourage a talented pipeline of employees into VET and STEM-related careers, with a strong focus on female and Indigenous student participation.

“Students have been afforded the opportunity to better understand electricity production and apply their classroom learnings in a practical environment,” Principal of Clermont State High School, Emelie Adams said.

READ: Local students put STEM skills to test in hands-on workshop

The QMEA engages with 80 schools throughout Queensland and is a partnership between the QRC and the Queensland Government under its Gateway to Industry Schools program.

In a first for the region, the new QMEA program is designed to complement the Year 8 science curriculum with the help of engineers from Bravus Mining and Resources.

David Boshoff, CEO of Bravus Mining and Resources, said it was important to teach the next generation that both coal and renewables would be needed to create a sustainable global energy mix.

READ: Mastermyne scores $60m mine contract extension

“As the world’s number one international solar company and India’s largest private electricity generator, Bravus’ parent company, the Adani Group, has a unique view of the market and we see there will be a need for both coal and renewables in the energy mix to meet growing demand in Asia as people there emerge from energy poverty,” he said.

“Bravus is proud to participate in this event which helps students understand the need for a sustainable global energy mix, along with the careers paths on offer in the field.

“It is important to us that schoolchildren know of the many opportunities open to them in Queensland’s resources sector, bringing highly-skilled careers to regional communities, while also having a strong understanding of how the energy system works.”


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