Meteor dust could fall on your roof this weekend.
Meteor dust could fall on your roof this weekend. Marita Hills Photography

Collect meteor dust on your roof this weekend

THE best meteor display in a decade could end up leaving meteor dust on your roof this weekend.

The Perseid meteor shower is the debris left by the Comet Swift-Tuttle, the largest object known to repeatedly pass by Earth.

Do you plan on watching the meteor shower this weekend?

This poll ended on 13 August 2016.

Current Results

Yes, I'll be watching the sky.

61%

No, I couldn't care less.

1%

Hopefully I'll see it if I get the chance.

36%

This is not a scientific poll. The results reflect only the opinions of those who chose to participate.

The comet debris heats up as enters the earth's atmosphere and normally disintegrates into "dust".

Wappa Falls Observatory owner Owen Bennedick said anything that enters earth atmosphere ends up the ground.

Owen Bennedick from Wappa Falls Observatory is excited about one of the best meteor showers in a decade will be in the sky this weekend.
Owen Bennedick from Wappa Falls Observatory is excited about one of the best meteor showers in a decade will be in the sky this weekend. Patrick Woods

"Most of it is tiny, the size of a grain sand," Mr Bennedick said.

But you can distinguish ordinary dusty in the gutters from the "fairy dust" left by meteors.

"If you look at it closely, meteor dust looks like tiny black glass beads," Mr Bennedick said.

He has collected over 100 meteorites from all over the world which he has on display at Wappa Falls.

"The normal dust you see in the gutter is all different colours from the types of minerals in the earth.

"The meteorite is tiny black glass beads."

Owen Bennedick from Wappa Falls Observatory is excited about one of the best meteor showers in a decade will be in the sky this weekend. Meteorite from the moon.
Owen Bennedick from Wappa Falls Observatory is excited about one of the best meteor showers in a decade will be in the sky this weekend. Meteorite from the moon. Patrick Woods

She heard a "loud bang" and then found a rock on the floor that was "hot".

Mr Benedick believed this was more likely to have been a piece of satellite, but was hoping Ms Collins would bring the rock for closer inspection.

While scientific experts are predicting this weekend's shower, which is expected to peak on August 12 and 13 , will be the best in a decade, Mr Bennedick is not placing any bets on it.

"We never promote meteor showers as sometimes they are next to nothing.

"They can be very hit and miss."


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