Ross Nicholson, Ross Faint, Carenda Jenkin, Josie Heading, Stuart Austin and Elisha Seekamp at the Commercial Hotel rallied support for the Convoy of No Confidence.
Ross Nicholson, Ross Faint, Carenda Jenkin, Josie Heading, Stuart Austin and Elisha Seekamp at the Commercial Hotel rallied support for the Convoy of No Confidence. Tara Miko

Convoy picks up support

CLERMONT showed it has no confidence in Canberra as the convoy from Cairns rolled through town.

More than $13,250 in fuel was raised in less than 24 hours, and 300 of the town’s population of 2000 signed petitions, urging Prime Minister Julia Gillard to call an early election.

Commanders of all vehicles from heavy haulage trucks, road trains, caravans, motorhomes and motorbikes sounded their frustrations and horns coming into town in a move Clermont region convoy organiser Elisha Seekamp called “a true demonstration of how disappointed people are” with the Gillard Government.

“In only 24 hours, we gathered 300 signatures for the petition, local beef producers had organised fuel donations of over $13,000 and the CWA had organised food and drinks for everyone in the convoy,” Ms Seekamp said.

“This support from a town of only 2000 was amazing and a testament to a united effort.”

Bruce Cobb, of Mellaluka, north-west of Clermont, joined the convoy in protest to Ms Gillard’s “knee-jerk” reaction on the live export fiasco in a show of support for his fellow beef producers around the nation.

Although not directly impacted by the export ban, Mr Cobb said the premature reaction from the Labor Government put the “future of our region and our country” in jeopardy.

“The policies and live export ban, and the knee jerk reaction it was dealt with, was just disgraceful,” he said.

“I’d like to know how many of the sitting parliamentarians in the lower house have actually run a small business successfully.”

Convoy of No Confidence organisers said the aim of the nationwide movement was to unite rural and regional Australia, and deliver a message to Canberra that confidence is lost in the current government’s policies, including the proposed carbon tax.

Ross Faint, owner of “Glenmore” property between Clermont Coal and Blair Athol mines, said Prime Minister Julia Gillard’s advisors should be “struck off the payroll” for not proposing policies that govern for the people.

“We haven’t felt the full ramifications of the carbon tax, but we only have to look at how the government handled the live export and get a pretty good idea about how our future is going to be governed,” Mr Faint said.

“The Ginger Turkey is the most unpopular Labor prime minister ever, and she needs to get out and talk to the average person in the street to find out why we don’t like her.”

From 11 different routes from all corners of the country, the convoys arrived in Canberra on Monday, and delivered the collected petition with thousands of signatures to Opposition Leader Tony Abbott yesterday.


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