Grand Theft Auto video game
Grand Theft Auto video game Contributed

Parents petition Target to stop selling Grand Theft Auto V

A SUNSHINE Beach father is among the thousands who have signed an online petition urging Target to remove the latest version of Grand Theft Auto from its shelves.

Jonathan Sligh signed the petition on change.org, which has gained more than 13,000 signatures in just four days.

His three sons bought the first version of the graphic video game about a decade ago. What he saw as he walked past their computer screen sickened him - and with each new version of the game the graphics and violence appear to get worse.

"Why would you base a game for fun on everything that's sh**ty in the world?" Mr Sligh said.

The petition, started by a domestic violence survivor known as Nicole, appeals to Target to "immediately withdraw Grand Theft Auto V from sale".

Grand Theft Auto V
Grand Theft Auto V

"The misogynistic GTA 5 literally makes a game of bashing, killing and horrific violence against woman. It also links sexual arousal and violence," it says.

"Games like this are grooming yet another generation of boys to tolerate violence against women. It is fuelling the epidemic of violence experienced by so many girls and women in Australia - and globally.

"Target, you pride yourself on being a family company, caring for local communities, and have a strong ethical sourcing policy. How can you do this while contributing to hostile and callous attitudes toward victims of violence and, more broadly, to all women?

"We urge you to follow the example set by New Zealand's largest retailer, NZ Warehouse Group, in upholding Corporate Social Responsibility and ethical corporate leadership by removing these games."

SCOPE Domestic and Family Violence Service manager Brigitte McLennan has joined in the call for the game to be removed from shelves.

Queensland police receive about 165 calls a day from victims of domestic violence.

"The message that this product is sending is that male violence against women is fun and okay," Ms McLennan said.

"In a time when reports of domestic violence are escalating, we need the whole community to embrace the message that male violence against women is not okay.

"We need retailers to understand that by promoting and selling this product they are potentially saying that sexual violence against women is acceptable."

Target did not respond to the Daily's queries.


Little splash of colour

Little splash of colour

The Clermont Peace Pole project has brought colour to the community.

Help shape the future of the arts

Help shape the future of the arts

Have your say on the future of the arts in the Central Highlands.

Five things to do in the region

Five things to do in the region

Five things to do in the Central Highlands.

Local Partners