(FILES) In this file photo taken on July 07, 2015 British Prime Minister David Cameron (R) and London Mayor Boris Johnson leave St Paul's Cathedral
(FILES) In this file photo taken on July 07, 2015 British Prime Minister David Cameron (R) and London Mayor Boris Johnson leave St Paul's Cathedral

David Cameron disses Boris in new memoir

DAVID Cameron has torn into Boris Johnson saying he "didn't believe in" Brexit - and backed it to boost his career.

The ex-Tory leader says Mr Johnson threw his weight behind the campaign even though he was "certain the Brexit side would lose", The Sun reports.

The former PM says Mr Johnson wanted to "become the darling of the party" using the referendum to ensure others, including Michael Gove, did not "win that crown".

He says: "The conclusion I am left with is that he risked an outcome he didn't believe in because it would help his political career."

Britain's former Prime Minister David Cameron said he thinks about the consequences of the Brexit referendum ‘every single day’. Picture: AP
Britain's former Prime Minister David Cameron said he thinks about the consequences of the Brexit referendum ‘every single day’. Picture: AP

His concerns about sovereignty, Mr Cameron claims, were "secondary to another concern for Boris: what was the best outcome for him?"

As Mr Johnson tries to strike a Brexit deal with the EU, Mr Cameron says Mr Johnson privately thinks there could be a "fresh negotiation" followed by a second Brexit vote.

In his memoirs, Mr Cameron said that when Mr Johnson attacked him over failing to cut immigration he said it became "open warfare".

He added: "The rules of engagement had been abandoned."

Mr Johnson backed Leave despite being offered the role of Defence Secretary.

In extracts of his long-awaited memoir serialised in the Sunday Times, Mr Cameron also labelled Brexiteer Michael Gove, who was once a close friend, a "foam-flecked Faragist".

On Mr Gove, the former PM said: "One quality shone through: disloyalty. Disloyalty to me and, later, disloyalty to Boris."

And he said Mr Gove's claim that the public were tired of experts made him "an ambassador for the truth-twisting age of populism".

It came after the ex-leader revealed he once called his one-time close friend "a w****r".

He made the revelation while lifting the lid on a major fall out when Mr Gove refused to budge as Education Secretary during the 2014 Cabinet reshuffle.

 

David Cameron also admitted to being "off his head" on dope at Eton. He also acknowledged that he later smoked it with his wife Samantha and friends. But in an interview ahead of next week's publication of his book For The Record, the ex-PM again refused to say whether he ever tried cocaine. Speculation that he might have at Oxford University dogged his time as Tory leader. The Eton incident was when he was 15.

Cameron said attacks by Priti Patel, who is now the Home Secretary, on his government's immigration record "shocked me most" but he did not want to fire her and create a "Brexit martyr".

He also says that Dominic Cummings, who is now a special adviser to the government, was part of a "cauldron of toxicity" with Nigel Farage.

Mr Cameron, who has refused all interview requests since leaving No10 in July 2016, opened up in an interview with The Times ahead of the publication of his long-awaited memoirs next week.

 

David Cameron has called Michael Gove a ‘foam-flecked Faragist’ in his new memoir. Picture: AP
David Cameron has called Michael Gove a ‘foam-flecked Faragist’ in his new memoir. Picture: AP

While insisting he was right to hold the EU referendum, Mr Cameron issued a grovelling apology for the chaos it had plunged Britain into.

Addressing his landmark decision on whether to hold the nationwide vote, Mr Cameron said he still believes it was right because a referendum was "inevitable".

Before Mr Cameron launched his blistering attack, Mr Johnson said he would always admire him.

Mr Johnson added: "Absolutely nothing that David Cameron says in his memoirs will diminish the affection and respect in which I hold him. He has a very distinguished record and a legacy to be proud of."

Mr Cameron has been reportedly paid £800,000 ($A1,454,000) for his memoirs, For The Record, which hits the shelves on Thursday. He has said profits will go to charities.

THE MADDER HULK GETS, THE STRONGER HULK GETS

Boris Johnson today vowed that Britain will break free of its EU 'manacles' like the Incredible Hulk.

The PM vowed to ignore a Commons vote ordering him to delay Brexit if negotiations break down - adding: "The madder Hulk gets, the stronger Hulk gets."

Mr Johnson's bullish declaration came ahead of crunch talks with Brussels chief Jean-Claude Juncker.

 

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker chairs a weekly meeting of the College of Commissioners at EU headquarters in Brussels, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Picture: AP
European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker chairs a weekly meeting of the College of Commissioners at EU headquarters in Brussels, Wednesday, Sept. 4, 2019. Picture: AP

There has been cautious optimism that Britain's negotiating team is on the brink of a backstop breakthrough.

Mr Johnson told the Mail on Sunday: "Bruce Banner might be bound in manacles, but when provoked he would explode out of them.

"Hulk always escaped, no matter how tightly bound in he seemed to be - and that is the case for this country.

"We will come out on October 31 and we will get it done."

"I think we will get there. I will be talking to Jean-Claude about how we're going to do it.

"I'm very confident. When I got this job everybody was saying there can be absolutely no change to the Withdrawal Agreement, the backstop was immutable, the arrangements by which the UK was kept locked in to the EU for ever, they said no one could change that.

"They have already moved off that and, as you know, there's a very, very good conversation going on about how to address the issues of the Northern Irish border.

BORIS 'TO PUSH THROUGH BREXIT IN TEN DAYS'

"A huge amount of progress is being made."

It comes after Mr Johnson vowed to push through a new Brexit deal in a 10-day blitz.

The Prime Minister and MPs will work round the clock during late-night and weekend sittings to thrash out an agreement before the October 31 deadline.

The Financial Times said that hopes to fast-track a new Brexit deal are being sparked by Mr Johnson's team, which has compiled plans to help the PM get a deal at a Brussels summit from October 17-18 with the European Union.

 

Stan Lee takes off The Incredible Hulk in Marvel Comics.
Stan Lee takes off The Incredible Hulk in Marvel Comics.

 

BRITAIN ON BRINK OF BACKSTOP BREAKTHROUGH

Number 10 believes Mr Johnson could then quickly pursue the new withdrawal deal through parliament.

The Prime Minister has repeatedly said that he will take Britain out of the EU at the end of October, and that he would rather be "dead in a ditch" than ask for an extension.

He could break the ongoing Brexit deadlock if he gets the bloc to ditch its red line of no-checks on the island of Ireland.

Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay has drawn up three tests the Government must meet before it formally asks to renegotiate the deal - and has passed two of them.

He told a key Cabinet committee this week that solutions have been found to avoid infrastructure on the border with Ireland, and a way to protect the integrity of the EU's single market.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson makes a speech at the Convention of the North at the Magna Centre on September 13, 2019 in Rotherham, England. Picture: Getty Images
Prime Minister Boris Johnson makes a speech at the Convention of the North at the Magna Centre on September 13, 2019 in Rotherham, England. Picture: Getty Images

But there is no solution yet to the third test ­- to avoid goods checks on the island of Ireland.

Mr Johnson must convince EU Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker to move on its red line.

He flies to Luxembourg on Monday to meet him for the first time since becoming PM.

Meanwhile Tory former Brexit secretary David Davis suggested the Government might have a "legal strategy" to avoid extending Britain's EU membership beyond October 31, despite the so-called Benn Act to avoid a no-deal.

This story first appeared in The Sun and has been published here with permission.


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