It’s one of our most popular beaches, but one photographer has made an unsettling discovery lurking below the surface – and it’s not a shark.
It’s one of our most popular beaches, but one photographer has made an unsettling discovery lurking below the surface – and it’s not a shark.

Deadly creature hidden at hotspot

Photographer Duncan Heuer has filmed a stunning video of a blue-ringed octopus at Sydney's Camp Cove beach.

Duncan Heuer came across the deadly creature hiding in the sand at the harbour-facing beach last Wednesday, with the deadly creature curling its tentacles "like a boxer".

Mr Heuer told Nine News that while he had hoped to photograph the creature he had been taken by surprise when he came across it.

A photographer has spotted a blue-ringed octopus at a popular Sydney beach (file image).
A photographer has spotted a blue-ringed octopus at a popular Sydney beach (file image).

"They're quite an exciting thing to find because they're very hard to spot," he said.

"I found a little sea spider on a rock that I was trying to photograph … While I was setting (my camera) up, this little octopus was on that rock as well, but I couldn't see it because it was camouflaged."

Mr Heuer said people might be surprised to find out how many blue-ringed octopuses were lurking around them.

 

"At night time, they're one of the prize things to see here in Sydney because they're actually a lot more common than people realise, but because of their cryptic nature they tend to hide away," he said.

Blue-ringed octopuses will only flash their striking colours when they are preparing to attack, according to the Australian Institute Of Marine Science.

Mr Heuer spotted the octopus at Camp Cove (file image). Picture: David Swift
Mr Heuer spotted the octopus at Camp Cove (file image). Picture: David Swift

Ranging in size from 12 to 20 centimetres, they will hide in rocks and crevices and usually only come out at night.

If stung a blue-ringed octopus' venom can prove deadly and will paralyse a person, causing them to lose the use of muscles but remain fully conscious.

Blue-ringed octopus victims will die because the paralysis causes a lack of oxygen, however, if a person is given CPR they are likely to survive.

In Australia there have only been two known deaths as the result of blue-ringed octopus bites.

Originally published as Deadly creature hidden at Sydney hotspot


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