Deadly day claims 19 lives, fears for frontline staff

 

Victoria recorded its deadliest day with another 19 deaths in the past 24 hours.

The new deaths included one male in 50s, one female in her 60s, two males in their 70s and one male and six females in their 80s, and one male and seven females in their 90s.

Fourteen of the 19 deaths have been linked to aged care settings.

But new case numbers have continued to fall with 322 new cases added to the state's tally.

It is the lowest daily increase since July 28 when 276 cases were recorded.

Another 105 mystery cases have been identified.

It comes as NSW recorded another 14 new cases, bringing the total number of cases across NSW to more than 3600 since the pandemic began. A total 111 people are being treated in the state and premier Gladys Berejiklian urged everyone to curtail activities outside their homes.

She said people visiting multiple venues in one day complicated contact tracing.

The number of infected Victorian healthcare has doubled in the past fortnight. Aaron Francis/The Australian
The number of infected Victorian healthcare has doubled in the past fortnight. Aaron Francis/The Australian

The state has more open restrictions than Victoria, which has five more weeks of strict lockdowns in Melbourne.

On Sunday, there were 994 active cases of COVID-19 among healthcare workers in Victoria, compared with 400 on July 27.

That is a jump of more than 590 cases in the past 14 days.

A total of 1725 medical ­professionals have been confirmed positive over the duration of the pandemic.

Even more have likely been forced into isolation due to close contacts with infected colleagues, friends and family.

AMA Victorian branch president Julian Rait said a national database was necessary to track cases in the healthcare workforce.

"AMA Victoria is extremely concerned by the rising prevalence of infection among healthcare workers, which would appear to exceed that of the wider community," Dr Rait said.

"Quite simply, the failure by various governments to properly record and analyse infections among healthcare workers is scandalous, as we are likely underestimating the true scale of the problem and are putting staff at higher risk."

Dr Rait said the AMA was pleased protective equipment protocols had been updated, but cases of inconsistent and "knock-off" supplies were still being reported, with some ­settings failing to provide adequate protection for staff.

Premier Daniel Andrews was confident Victoria had enough frontline staff to see out the pandemic.

"We've done a lot of contingency planning, a lot of work to try to make sure we have surge capacity, that we've got people we can call on," he said.

"We think we've got the reserves that we need, but there's a lot of stress there. They're all doing a fantastic job. We've got enough capacity."

Nurses from Western Australia were expected to touch down this week.

Victoria's Deputy Chief Health Officer Robyn Lawrence said the nurses would provide "care and support."

She said a "significant level of support" had been requested by Victoria, especially in relation to aged care homes.

''WA is in a fortunate position with very limited numbers of active COVID-19 cases.'' Dr Lawrence said.

 

 

FEARS FOR FRONTLINE STAFF

Coronavirus infections among healthcare staff have more than doubled in the past fortnight amid concern that the true scale of the problem is being underestimated.

The Australian Medical Association says it's "extremely concerned" at the rising number of healthcare staff infected, citing cheap protective equipment and a lack of standard protocols as potential causes.

Western Australian nurses will land in Victoria this week to help with the virus fight.

On Sunday, there were 994 active cases of COVID-19 among healthcare workers in Victoria, compared with 400 on July 27.

That is a jump of more than 590 cases in the past 14 days.

A total of 1725 medical ­professionals have been confirmed positive over the duration of the pandemic.

Even more have likely been forced into isolation due to close contacts with infected colleagues, friends and family.

AMA Victorian branch president Julian Rait said a national database was necessary to track cases in the healthcare workforce.

"AMA Victoria is extremely concerned by the rising prevalence of infection among healthcare workers, which would appear to exceed that of the wider community," Dr Rait said.

"Quite simply, the failure by various governments to properly record and analyse infections among healthcare workers is scandalous, as we are likely underestimating the true scale of the problem and are putting staff at higher risk."

Dr Rait said the AMA was pleased protective equipment protocols had been updated, but cases of inconsistent and "knock-off" supplies were still being reported, with some ­settings failing to provide adequate protection for staff.

Premier Daniel Andrews was confident Victoria had enough frontline staff to see out the pandemic.

"We've done a lot of contingency planning, a lot of work to try to make sure we have surge capacity, that we've got people we can call on," he said.

"We think we've got the reserves that we need, but there's a lot of stress there. They're all doing a fantastic job. We've got enough capacity."

Nurses from Western Australia were expected to touch down this week.

Victoria's Deputy Chief Health Officer Robyn Lawrence said the nurses would provide "care and support."

She said a "significant level of support" had been requested by Victoria, especially in relation to aged care homes.

''WA is in a fortunate position with very limited numbers of active COVID-19 cases.'' Dr Lawrence said.

 

 

White Island volcano survivor Stephanie Browitt with her mother, Marie. Picture: Alex Coppel
White Island volcano survivor Stephanie Browitt with her mother, Marie. Picture: Alex Coppel

MELBOURNE STRONG: WHITE ISLAND SURVIVOR'S LOCKDOWN PLEA

Inspirational Victorians have joined together for the Melbourne Strong campaign - to give encouragement and hope to anyone who is struggling though the lockdown.

Today, and in coming days, inspiring Victorians who have overcome adversity, some famous and others not so well-known, send their messages of strength to you.

White Island volcano survivor Stephanie Browitt has sent an inspirational message of support to her fellow Melburnians, saying lockdown is just a small sacrifice to save lives.

READ HER STORY HERE

 

FAMOUS MELBURNIANS SHARE #MELBOURNESTRONG MESSAGE

Victoria's most inspirational figures are imploring the state to unite in a new resolve against coronavirus.

New Zealand volcano eruption survivor Stephanie Browitt, AFL legend Neale Daniher and Bali bombing survivor Jason McCartney are leading the effort to overcome one of the greatest challenges in our state's history.

Everyday citizens, some who've fought wars and others bushfires, are also calling on Victorians to draw on the community spirit which has overcome obstacles once considered insurmountable as part of the Melbourne Strong campaign.

READ MORE

 

LOCKDOWN WILL KILL - BUT NOT FROM THE VIRUS

Politicians are destroying Australia - throwing a million people out of work, causing suicides - because they've fallen for two great weaknesses, both of which will extend crippling lockdowns much longer than necessary, writes Andrew Bolt.

READ HIS MONDAY OPINION STORY

 

 

 

 

Mounted police patrol the streets where an anti-lockdown rally was planned. Picture: Jake Nowakowski
Mounted police patrol the streets where an anti-lockdown rally was planned. Picture: Jake Nowakowski

 

 

 

A man is detained by police on Sunday after an anti-lockdown protest in the city. Picture: Getty
A man is detained by police on Sunday after an anti-lockdown protest in the city. Picture: Getty

 

 

 

HOTEL QUARANTINE SECURITY GUARDS HANDLED BAGS

Security guards routinely handled guests' bags against health advice at some of Melbourne's quarantine hotels.

The Herald Sun has been told by multiple sources who were working at the hotels that some private guards had no qualms about carrying suitcases and bags from airport buses through hotel foyers and up to rooms.

They were exposing themselves to contamination as they tried to welcome the potentially coronavirus-infected returned travellers.

Those who saw what was going on said the guards should have got the passengers to take their own bags up to their rooms.

It is expected the widespread handling of baggage by security will emerge as one of many shortcomings in the quarantine hotels when an inquiry into its handling convenes.

READ THE FULL STORY

 

 

Originally published as Deadly day claims 19 lives, fears for frontline staff

Melburnians stroll around a deserted Docklands precinct during stage 4 lockdowns. Picture: David Geraghty
Melburnians stroll around a deserted Docklands precinct during stage 4 lockdowns. Picture: David Geraghty

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