MOMENT TO REMEMBER: Ex-servicemen and the crowd observed a minute’s silence. rp-11112010-066
MOMENT TO REMEMBER: Ex-servicemen and the crowd observed a minute’s silence. rp-11112010-066

Emerald remembers sacrifices

LEST WE FORGET: Wreaths were laid to commemorate those who fought in wars for Australia. rp-11112010-069

IN a fitting ceremony yesterday, Emerald remembered those who lost their lives or suffered in war and armed conflicts.

A Remembrance Day service was held at the Cenotaph and marked a minute’s silence in memory of those fallen or injured.

Bishop Alfred led the gathering in a prayer and St Patrick’s students Elle Wearing and Harry Marshall sang a touching rendition of the Flanders Poppy poem.

Wreaths along with poppies were laid as the flags were hung at half mast.

Ex-servicemen attended the service and stood fast for the sounding of the last post and singing of the national anthem.

Remembrance Day was originally called Armistice Day, as the day was to commemorate the end of hostilities for World War I and the signing of the armistice, which took place on November 11, 1918, at the 11th hour.

A minute’s silence was introduced as part of the commemorative service and the Flanders poppy became the flower of remembrance, accepted throughout the allied nations as it was one of the first plants that sprouted on the battlefields of northern France and Belgium.

The name Armistice Day was changed to Remembrance Day after the end of World War II, as a day to commemorate all who have died in war.

In 1997, then-Governor General of Australia Sir William Deane formally declared November 11 Remembrance Day and urged Australians to observe one minute’s silence at 11am on November 11 each year.


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