The boy with suspected chickenpox played in the under-10 division at the Red Rooster Junior Carnival in Rockhampton at the weekend.
The boy with suspected chickenpox played in the under-10 division at the Red Rooster Junior Carnival in Rockhampton at the weekend.

EXPLAINED: What you need to know about CQ chickenpox case

THE boy with chickenpox who played in the under-10 division at the Red Rooster Junior Carnival at the weekend is from Rockhampton.

The two-day event at Cyril Connell Fields was organised by the Rockhampton Touch Association, which acted quickly to alert those who attended.

A post was placed on the RTA Facebook page early this morning and administrator Denise Edwards texted each of the contacts of the 107 teams so they could notify parents individually.

The post read: “His rash appeared later on Saturday and parents thought it was from the heat. But overnight it became obvious it was chickenpox and he did not attend on Sunday.

“We apologise for any consequences that may occur and sincerely hope everyone stays safe.

“We spent weeks working on measures to minimise the spread of another virus so it is our hope these measures will work as well for this one.”

READ: Player at CQ touch carnival had infectious disease

Central Queensland Hospital and Health Service public health physician Dr Gulam Khandaker said a General Practitioner had advised CQ Health of a possible case of chickenpox, but the infection had not been confirmed by laboratory testing.

“It is very likely that most participants who attended the junior touch football carnival have previously been vaccinated for chickenpox, and those who have been vaccinated can expect a mild case if infected,” Dr Khandaker said.

“Anyone with chickenpox is usually infectious from about two days before they develop a rash until the blisters have formed scab – usually about four or five days later.

“Chickenpox can be spread through contact with an infectious person and while there is usually minimal contact in touch football, I would urge participants, particularly teammates and team officials, to watch for symptoms.

“The usual time between contact with the virus and developing chickenpox is about 14 to 16 days, although sometimes it can take longer.

“Infection will start with cold-like symptoms such as mild fever, headache, runny nose, cough and a rash.

“The rash, which starts as small pink blotches, will appear after another one or two days.”


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