A couple have been banned from using a controversial technique which uses tree frog poison to cleanse the body.
A couple have been banned from using a controversial technique which uses tree frog poison to cleanse the body.

Frog poison practitioners banned from dangerous technique

A  couple have been banned from practising a controversial treatment which uses the poison from tree frogs to cleanse but has been linked to a death in New South Wales.

Carlie Angel and Brad Williams, who trade as Two Wolves - One Body, were prohibited from practising the techniques known as Kambo or Sananga in April by the Victorian Health Complaints Commissioner.

Brad and Carlie from Two Wolves – One Body are Kambo Practitioners. Picture: Two Wolves One Body – Facebook
Brad and Carlie from Two Wolves – One Body are Kambo Practitioners. Picture: Two Wolves One Body – Facebook

On Thursday the South Australian Health and Community Services Complaints Commissioner also handed down prohibition orders against the pair, following an investigation which found that there was no medical benefit from the treatment.

The investigation found that there were significant adverse affects to the treatment, which uses secretions from the Amazonian tree frog in a cleansing ritual.

 

The controversial technique used poison secreted by tree frogs.
The controversial technique used poison secreted by tree frogs.

 

Associate Professor Grant Davies said the technique could be "very dangerous for some individuals".

"From the expert evidence, I have formed (the opinion) they are unsafe, and that the effectiveness of such treatments cannot be guaranteed," he said.

"I have decided to issue the indefinite prohibition orders to protect South Australians from

potential harm from these practices.

"These prohibition orders will take effect from midnight (Thursday), when the current interim prohibition orders against Ms Angel and Mr Williams cease."

Ms Angel and Mr Williams are believed to be the only practitioners offering the service in South Australia.

In March, Natasha Lechner died in northern NSW from a heart attack after a "kambo ceremony".

The symptoms of the technique range from mild to severe pain as well as vomiting, diarrhoea, dehydration, electrolyte loss, and hypotension and tachycardia in individuals with underlying cardiovascular issues.


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