Gym shorts were the fitness trend that dominated in 2020, but an Aussie brand has a clever solution to a common problem with the skin-tight item.
Gym shorts were the fitness trend that dominated in 2020, but an Aussie brand has a clever solution to a common problem with the skin-tight item.

‘Game-changing’ fix to sausage leg problem

While the vast majority of us can't wait to see the back of 2020, there's one element of this year that will be sticking around for good - teeny tiny shorts.

It might seem like the unlikeliest fashion trend considering most of us have been cooped up inside for a large chuck of time, living in comfy clothes for months - but according to several leading fitness brands, shoppers have been buying the skin-tight pants in record numbers.

"Bike shorts saw a resurgence this year largely due to the demand for athleisure and a 'comfort-first' wardrobe," Vera Yan, who co-owns Bondi-based activewear brand Nimble, told news.com.au.

"We first launched our bike shorts last year and they sold out almost instantly.

"This season they are the hero of each collection and offer an alternative to our popular leggings."

RELATED: Best plus-size activewear to buy in Australia

Nimble has created an answer to the ‘sausage leg’ problem with bike shorts with its laser cut hem pants that don’t dig in. Picture: Instagram
Nimble has created an answer to the ‘sausage leg’ problem with bike shorts with its laser cut hem pants that don’t dig in. Picture: Instagram

Nimble - whose clothing is made using recycled bottles pulled from the ocean - have designed its shorts with a "game-changing" feature to avoid a common complaint people have.

"Our customers have found the laser cut styles we make are a game changer as they don't ride up and the uniqueness of the design means there's no sausage leg," Ms Yan said.

The material is also super breathable and "buttery soft" - a detail that has proved very popular with shoppers on Instagram.

One set, the brand's polka dot print, comes with a matching bra and dog leash and is being snapped all over social media.

Others share photos of themselves out for brunch and out on bush walks in the garment, proving how versatile the item is.

In another nod to the popularity of the style, the brand's second collaboration with The Iconic also stars a pair of $79 bike shorts, showing just how mainstream the once "daring" trend has become.

Many people wear the skimpy shorts to brunch. Picture: Instagram
Many people wear the skimpy shorts to brunch. Picture: Instagram

Another Australian brand who has experienced a huge demand for the skimpy activewear piece is STAX who have seen the Lycra gym-favourite sell out again and again.

As a result, the activewear brand born in Perth is releasing yet another pair of the short shorts on Boxing Day, this time in a trendy tie-dye print.

"We've even seen a few boys rocking them so we're working on making them a men's item too," Matilda Murray, the brand's co-owner, told news.com.au, adding the celebrity-style garment has "proven to be extremely popular, both inside and outside the gym".

 

 

Earlier this year Ms Murray revealed a collection of grey shorts - which retail for $54.95 - had earned $250,000 in minutes. While a second seamless collection which went on sale in November and had matching "secret" G-string undies to go with them netted the brand over $1 million.

"It just shows, bike shorts are here to stay," Ms Murray said.

This seamless collection earned STAX creators $1 million. Picture: Instagram
This seamless collection earned STAX creators $1 million. Picture: Instagram

Other Australian brands that have jumped on the bike-short bandwagon include high-street store Glassons, budget discount retailer Kmart and scrunch-bum creators Echt.

Celebrity-owned brands such as Bec Judd's JAGGAD and Nadia Bartel's Henne have all released versions too.

The skimpy style is approved by celebs like Rebecca Judd who launched her own collection this year. Picture: Instagram
The skimpy style is approved by celebs like Rebecca Judd who launched her own collection this year. Picture: Instagram

Even gyms have got in on the action, such as cycling studio Cycology Club in Sydney's Surry Hills which launched its own branded bike shorts for members and cult-fitness chain Barry's Bootcamp.

Cycologist Club has designed its own range of shorts for its cycling classes. Picture: Instagram
Cycologist Club has designed its own range of shorts for its cycling classes. Picture: Instagram

However, not all gyms welcomed the risqué fitness garment with open arms, as one Sydney woman discovered earlier this year.

Gabi Goddard from Hornsby was wearing a pair of grey bike shorts and a black crop top at a gym when she said she was approached by a member of staff and asked to go home and "change" before she could continue her workout.

The 27-year-old claimed the employee was concerned she was showing "too much skin" in front of a class of schoolkids who were also using the same fitness facility.

It later emerged Gabi had mistakenly been wearing a pair of "scrunch bum" shorts - which are deliberately designed to accentuate the body's natural figure - inside out, writing on Instagram it was "probably what the problem was all along".

Gabi Goddard made headlines when she claimed she was told to leave her Sydney gym because of her bike shorts. Picture: Instagram
Gabi Goddard made headlines when she claimed she was told to leave her Sydney gym because of her bike shorts. Picture: Instagram

However her story sparked outrage with many arguing gyms shouldn't be able to police what women wear for workouts.

Continue the conversation @RebekahScanlan | rebekah.scanlan@news.com.au

Originally published as 'Game-changing' fix to sausage leg problem

Shoppers love matching with their dog leads. Picture: Instagram
Shoppers love matching with their dog leads. Picture: Instagram
Barry’s Bootcamp has its own branded bike shorts. Picture: Instagram
Barry’s Bootcamp has its own branded bike shorts. Picture: Instagram
The story sparked outrage with many arguing women should be allowed to wear what they want. Picture: Instagram
The story sparked outrage with many arguing women should be allowed to wear what they want. Picture: Instagram

Miner recalls ‘brief few seconds’ of near-death experience

Premium Content Miner recalls ‘brief few seconds’ of near-death experience

Crash victim speaks out to save the lives of others

Emerald business donates more than $45k to CQ hospitals

Premium Content Emerald business donates more than $45k to CQ hospitals

‘As a business we rely on the community around us and therefore to give back feels...

CQ cricket feast: Three days, 40 teams, seven venues

Premium Content CQ cricket feast: Three days, 40 teams, seven venues

‘We’ve had an awesome response’: Stage set for Frenchville Sports Club Country...