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Who's the boss? Women moving on up in agriculture

Women just have to work smarter, not harder says Nat Daniels from Wyngarra, Gore. Photo Chantel Renae Photography.
Women just have to work smarter, not harder says Nat Daniels from Wyngarra, Gore. Photo Chantel Renae Photography. Chantel Renae Photography

NAT Daniels is one of a growing number of women working in management roles in agriculture.

The 29-year-old has overseen the day-to-day running on Wyngarra, a 3200-hectare southern Queensland wool-growing property for the past three years.

It's a position she relishes for the responsibility it entails and the freedom the comes with a rural lifestyle.

And after a childhood spent on properties managed by her parents, Anne and Glen Dedini, in the Riverina area and then along the Queensland/New South Wales border, she knew her heart belonged in the bush.

"I have a younger brother and five sisters so, as soon as we were old enough, we were very involved and always helping out," Nat explained.

"Dad never made any distinctions between girls and boys, you just had to be old enough to have a crack at work."

She left school and worked around Deniliquin, before taking on a job as a jillaroo on a 105,000ha property called Oak Park, at Charleville.

It was a long way from home but a "great boss" made her foray into the full-time agricultural work rewarding.

After Charleville she headed east and did a stint at Beef City feedlot and with Leitch Pastoral Company before joining Sandy and David Bartlett's operation as manager at Wyngarra.

She can't remember a time when being a woman has worked against her and it's an industry she'd recommend for young women like Hannah.

Today she said more women were in agricultural management had paved the way for less discrimination.

"I give 110% because I want to show I can do my job well, rather than prove I can do it as a woman."

Nat Daniels manages a wool growing property on the Darling Downs and says being a woman has never stopped her succeeding in the bush. Photo by Chantel Renae Photography.
Nat Daniels manages a wool growing property on the Darling Downs and says being a woman has never stopped her succeeding in the bush. Photo by Chantel Renae Photography. Chantel Renae Photography

Topics:  farming rural shearing


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