Murder victim Paul Karran.
Murder victim Paul Karran. CONTRIBUTED

Murder goes to Supreme Court

MURDER victim Paul Karran died from multiple injuries to his abdomen and chest, Gladstone Magistrate Court heard yesterday.

Mr Karran was found dead under a doona in his Gladstone home on January 30, 2010.

It is thought he died some days earlier.

The man charged with his murder, Peter Edward Bacon, appeared in court via video link and sat with his head in his hands as pathologist Dr Nigel Buxton shared details of the autopsy.

Dr Buxton told the court how Karran had suffered significant injuries to his chest, resulting in a collapsed lung, broken ribs and a flailed chest.

"The injuries to his chest were severe. They would have taken some force to cause," Dr Buxton said.

He likened the injury to someone dropping down on their knees on to Mr Karran's chest.

Mr Karran also suffered a laceration to his abdomen, in particular, his mesentery.

"That is a nasty injury. I have seen this type of injury in motor vehicle traumas, and once when a parachuter's equipment failed to open," Dr Buxton said.

Dr Buxton also revealed how long, brown hair was found in Mr Karran's left hand, as well as caught in the belt loop of his trousers.

An alcohol reading performed on Mr Karran's body revealed that he was likely to be intoxicated at the time of death, with a blood alcohol reading of 0.355.

"With that reading, I would say that the person would be unsteady on their feet and incoherent. They would be quite significantly under the influence of alcohol," Dr Buxton said.

Magistrate Russell Warfield was satisfied that the prosecution had enough evidence against Bacon for the case to proceed to Rockhampton Supreme Court.


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