ADAPTING: David Carter is a science and modern history teacher at Emerald Christian College.
ADAPTING: David Carter is a science and modern history teacher at Emerald Christian College.

Heroes of the pandemic: School teacher

SOME people are still required to go to work during this national shutdown.

We're speaking with essential workers to hear how their jobs have changed and how they're keeping things turning in the Central Highlands.

We'll bring you their stories.

DAVID Carter always wanted to be a teacher. The 32-year-old father followed his dream two years ago and has since been teaching science and modern history to high school students at Emerald Christian College.

"I like sparking the curiosity in their minds about the world, especially being science, understanding how things happen," he said.

"When they figure it out for themselves, that's what every teacher loves. That 'ah-ha' moment is probably the gold mine."

One of the challenges of home-based learning was that it had limited the hands-on aspects of teaching.

"With science you deal with things in the abstract, you talk about a force but what does that mean?

"When you visually show them and do experiments, that's what science is.

"And that's been the hardest thing, trying to embed experiments they can do at home, without the equipment."

Unlike many other essential workers, Mr Carter has also faced the challenge of having a young daughter with a weak immune system, putting her in the high-risk category during the pandemic.

Although he and his wife weren't too worried initially, it "started to hit home" when the first coronavirus case was reported at the Brisbane hospital where his daughter was born.

"You start hearing rumours there's a case around Blackwater, Moranbah, Gracemere, and we have family there so you're more concerned for them," Mr Carter said.

He was told to stay home during the first week of Term 2 for his family's safety, but he jumped at the chance to head back to the classroom when the time came.

"I was climbing the walls at home, so I think my wife fully supported the decision," Mr Carter said with a laugh.

"Don't get sick, that's the only thing she said to me."

While some students have thrived in the home environment, others haven't done so well, and Mr Carter expects it to be a difficult transition back to the norm.

"We are continually assessing the students so we have an idea of where they're at but we have to take into consideration everything that's happened," he said.

"Some students have got all the resources and can engage properly and others not so much, so it's an unfair advantage.

"It will be more of a day by day basis."


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