How Queensland kids are coping going back to school

MORE than 240,000 Prep, Year, 11 and 12 students were allowed to walk back through the front gates of schools this morning as COVID-19 lockdown restrictions lift.

Schools will have to reinforce personal hygiene practices, remind children and staff to stay home if they are unwell, ramp up cleaning, and reduce the number of students mixing through limiting transitions between classes and staggering lunch breaks and introducing staggered drop-off and pick-up.

Teachers will have to socially distance, and parents will not be permitted to walk their young children into the classrooms, rather saying goodbye at the front gates, where teachers will then collect them.

It comes as parents with children in years 2-10 will wait until Friday to know if their children will be allowed to return to school this term, expecting to be back on May 25.

 

Cannon Hill Anglican College year 12 student William Ewart said he thought going back to school would be enjoyable.

Year 12 students at Cannon Hill Anglican College Edie Biasibetti 16 and Will Ewart 17 who are looking forward to getting back to school. Pic Peter Wallis
Year 12 students at Cannon Hill Anglican College Edie Biasibetti 16 and Will Ewart 17 who are looking forward to getting back to school. Pic Peter Wallis


The senior student who has an interest in studying business beyond schools said the home-learning experience, while short-lived, prepared students for the future.

"The home learning experience is very eye opening for the future in university," he said.

Edie Biasibetti year 12 student said she was "really excited" to go back to school today.

"To see my grade and teachers in real life after seeing them online for so long, it's really exciting," she said.

"I think I was really lucky to have school like CHAC and learning from home really has been eye opening, learning how to stay motivated by yourself and checking in with everyone online, I think we'll all be more grateful to come back and be in our face-to-face learning environment."

Twins Alistair and Oscar Ormston Bell, 5 have been counting down the number of sleeps until their back with friends in class today.
Just a small cohort of students have been in classrooms at Our Lady Help of Christians in Hendra while the majority have been remote learning this term.

Alastair and Oscar Ormston Bell (both 5) who are excited to her back starting school again. Picture: Peter Wallis
Alastair and Oscar Ormston Bell (both 5) who are excited to her back starting school again. Picture: Peter Wallis

Mother Sandra Bell said her twins were very excited to be back in their normal classroom with their regular teacher.

"They're really excited about all of their other friends coming back to school, they asked how many sleeps it was going to be," she said.

"All the prep kids had only just started school when they had to go through big changes and were quite confused about where their regular teacher was," she said.

"They've said when their teacher is back it means the virus is gone."

She said the children now understood the importance of hygiene and the changes to schools.

"They're really good washing their hands now, they wash them straight away and for the right amount of time," she said.

"Normally the little kids would get taken into the school grounds but now they will trial the drop off zone, the teachers will be there to help the little kids with their school bags and what to do."

Originally published as How Queensland kids are coping going back to school


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