WARNING: 248 cars still fitted with deadly Takata airbags on Mackay streets.
WARNING: 248 cars still fitted with deadly Takata airbags on Mackay streets.

Hundreds of deadly airbags remain on Mackay streets

THERE are 248 cars still fitted with deadly Takata airbags on Mackay streets, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has warned.

The ACCC's data highlighted concerns about regional areas including Mackay, Rockhampton, Townsville, Cairns and Toowoomba - which still have more than 1700 outstanding airbags.

The Takata airbag recall is the world's largest automotive recall, affecting an estimated 100 million vehicles globally.

There have been more than 330 injuries and 30 deaths reported worldwide from the airbags, with one death and three injuries in Australia, including one serious injury.

Under the recall, owners are entitled to have their faulty Takata airbags replaced free of charge.

ACCC deputy chair Delia Rickard said it was important for vehicle owners to check if they were impacted.

"These airbags are very dangerous and have the potential to explode with too much force, even in low speed accidents, sending sharp metal fragments into the vehicle at high speed, potentially killing or seriously injuring its occupants," Ms Rickard said.

"We are concerned about the disproportionate number of outstanding airbags in some communities, including those from a culturally and linguistically diverse background, where there has been less take up of the free replacement service.

"Manufacturers have found it difficult to reach some drivers who may not have been as responsive to the warnings and notices sent to them, calls, text messages or in the case of critical vehicles, in-person visits urging them to get their airbags replaced."

Australian Competition and Consumer Commission deputy chair Delia Rickard. Picture: supplied by ACCC.
Australian Competition and Consumer Commission deputy chair Delia Rickard. Picture: supplied by ACCC.

More stories:

Vietnam aftermath still affecting veterans

How confronting the past inspired an artist

Why early intervention in teens could save adult lives

The ACCC has been working to raise awareness and educate consumers across a range of these suburbs, to check to make sure their car is not under recall.

"It is important that we all help spread the word. If you know someone who lives in these areas or who you think may not know about the recall, tell them about it and offer to help them check their car," Ms Rickard said.

"It takes less than a minute and together we can help reduce the number of dangerous airbags in cars on our roads.

"Anyone whose car is subject to the recall should not delay and contact a dealership to book their car in urgently for a free airbag replacement."

Consumers who are required to leave their vehicle with the manufacturer for more than 24 hours to have the airbag replaced may be entitled to a free loan car or have their transport costs covered for the period they are without their vehicle.

Consumers can visit ismyairbagsafe.com.au, the Product Safety Australia page, or contact their manufacturer to check if their vehicle is affected.

A list of vehicle manufacturer helplines and contact details are available online.

 

Subscriber benefits:

Your dose of Harry Bruce cartoons

Five ways to get more from your digital subscription

WATCH: Your guide to reading the Daily Mercury online


NAMED: Who will be key to Capras under-16 campaign

Premium Content NAMED: Who will be key to Capras under-16 campaign

Young guns counting down to season kickoff in Cyril Connell Challenge.

Man crashes car through garage

Premium Content Man crashes car through garage

Paramedics are at the scene assessing the patient.

CFMMEU officials face court over alleged abuse at CQ mine

Premium Content CFMMEU officials face court over alleged abuse at CQ mine

CFMMEU mining and energy Qld president Stephen Smyth is one of the five officials...