Supplied Editorial Large crocodile found floating at Dickson Inlet at Port Douglas.
 PICTURE: Port Douglas Yacht Club
Supplied Editorial Large crocodile found floating at Dickson Inlet at Port Douglas. PICTURE: Port Douglas Yacht Club

‘Just a shame’: Huge Far North croc mourned

A LARGE void has been left in the Port Douglas sailing community after a longtime reptilian resident was tragically found dead from being entangled in fishing and vessel equipment.

A Port Douglas Yacht Club member saw the carcass at Dickson Inlet late last week before police and Queensland Parks and Wildlife Service were called.

Club manager Sam Leo said it was tragic for the 4-5m croc to go out that way.

"It's extremely unfortunate and unlucky. Everyone at the club and in the wider sailing community are so croc wise and understanding from an environmental position," Mr Leo said.

"We're in their habitat and we respect that, so to see something like this is just a shame."

 

The large crocodile found floating at Dickson Inlet at Port Douglas last Friday. PICTURE: Port Douglas Yacht Club
The large crocodile found floating at Dickson Inlet at Port Douglas last Friday. PICTURE: Port Douglas Yacht Club


Mr Leo said once the "old boy" was retrieved from the water, it took about one hour to untangle the rope and steel wires of a mooring line and two crab pots from his body.

"It wasn't until he was pulled out of the water that we saw the full extent of what happened," he said.

"Crocs are known to get their snouts caught in crab pots.

"He must've gone into a death roll not knowing what was going on because the steel mooring line was wrapped about six times."

 

The large crocodile being retrieved at Dickson Inlet at Port Douglas last Friday. PICTURE: Port Douglas Yacht Club
The large crocodile being retrieved at Dickson Inlet at Port Douglas last Friday. PICTURE: Port Douglas Yacht Club

Mr Leo said he did not believe the equipment were discarded and that others in the area would have spotted anything out of the ordinary.

He said the croc was known as the only "big, dominant" male croc in the area and that the inlet was his domain.

"From all accounts, he wasn't an overly aggressive crocodile," Mr Leo said.

"It's left a large void in the history of big crocs up here.

"He would've been around for decades."

 

toby.vue@news.com.au

 

 

 

 

Originally published as 'Just a shame': Huge Far North croc mourned


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