Menu
Entertainment

Katie Noonan asks you to raise your voice for domestic violence cause

Queensland Music Festival artistic director Katie Noonan is asking you to join her in singing John Farnham's hit You're the Voice to raise awareness of family and domestic violence.
Queensland Music Festival artistic director Katie Noonan is asking you to join her in singing John Farnham's hit You're the Voice to raise awareness of family and domestic violence. Justin Nicholas

WE'RE not gonna sit in silence. We're not gonna live with fear.

When Australian singer-songwriter Katie Noonan listened to the words of John Farnham's You're the Voice recently, she realised she could use their power for an important purpose.

Since being named artistic director of the Queensland Music Festival, Noonan was grappling with how she could use the role to take a stand against family and domestic violence.

"I started ruminating upon the words of basically our unofficial national anthem You're the Voice and thought, 'Wow, when you look at that song through the filter of domestic and family violence it's actually incredibly apt and incredibly beautiful and hopeful and strong'," Noonan said.

That hope and strength will be echoed by thousands of singers when they join together in song for the festival's You're the Voice musical event.

Choirs across the country will join a 2500-strong chorus based in the South Bank Piazza on Saturday, July 29 via livestream and sing the John Farnham hit while conducted by Choir of Hard Knocks' Dr Jonathon Welch.

"At 5pm on July 29 you know that wherever you are in the country, you will be singing along with thousands of other people at the same time, singing for the same reason," Noonan said.

"I'm a bit of a hippy, but you know the vibrations and the energy of that is going to be incredible. It's going to be a really momentous moment."

Noonan will be joined on stage by a line-up of stars, as well as event patron Dame Quentin Bryce, domestic and family violence campaigner Rosie Batty and Allison Baden-Clay's sister, Vanessa Fowler.

"It's just incredible to be around that strength and resilience," Noonan said.

She said while she had not experienced family or domestic violence first-hand, she felt she had to speak out about it, and believed it was the responsibility of musicians and artists to comment on the "orders of the day in our society".

"I know this is a problem and I know I want to do something," she said.

"We as a collective, we're a powerful bunch.

"We have the power to make politicians listen and make discussions be had, and therefore laws get changed and people's lives are improved. You know, all the big stuff."

If you would like to raise your voice for the cause, visit the festival website for more details and to register your choir, or to register as an individual.

Topics:  choir domestic violence family violence john farnham katie noonan queensland music festival south bank


Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Region faces wild wind

DESTROYED: Half of the roof of the Moranbah home was ripped off from the 104km/h wind.

Moranbah residents say weather is worse than the cyclone.

Heroic rescue saves life

CLOSE CALL: Leslie Cruthers and Buddha at the spot the playful pup fell into the Nogoa River.

Kayakers rush to save dog walker clinging to riverbank.

National super star at age 13

Competing in Rotorua, New Zealand earlier this year.

Dingo local takes on international motocross competition.

Local Partners