Kermit, the green tree frog, is on the road to recovery after being run over by a wheelie bin.
Kermit, the green tree frog, is on the road to recovery after being run over by a wheelie bin. Australia Zoo

Kermit has wheelie bad day

IT AIN’T easy being green.

But being run over by a wheelie bin without your best “bear” friend or your pig girlfriend to help is just bad luck.

Kermit, the green tree frog, was taken more than 65km to Australia Zoo Wildlife Hospital for medical attention after he was injured at Cashmere this week.

At 13 grams, the little amphibian is one of the hospital’s smallest pat-ients.

But staff say the frog with the king-size courage has already captured their hearts.

Hospital veterinarian Amber Gillett said she had given Kermit some pain relief for what would be considerable discomfort.

“Kermit has suffered some soft trauma to the right leg after being run over by a wheelie bin,” Dr Gillett said.

“We don’t see many green tree frogs at the hospital, so to see a nice healthy one like Kermit is great.”

Dr Gillett said generally frogs were becoming rare as a result of a contagious disease called “chytrid fungus”. She said the fungus had already caused many Australian frog species to become extinct.

Kermit will return to the wild after a couple of days bed rest.

 

OUR FROGGY FRIENDS

Australia has more than 200 species of frogs

Green tree frogs are one of the largest species and are found in all states except Victoria and Tasmania.

The oldest recorded captive frog died at 23 years of age

Data: Australian Museum


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