Meg Milne from Emerald’s Bush Children’s is keen to be part of the super clinic’s services.
Meg Milne from Emerald’s Bush Children’s is keen to be part of the super clinic’s services. Lindsey Jackson

Kids' services keen to sign on

BUSH children are, by the very nature of their rural upbringing, resourceful.

So too is the charity that bears their name.

Emerald’s Royal Queensland Bush Children’s Health Service is back offering its free local and outreach facilities after being inundated by the 2010-11 flood and hoping to be invited on a locally-driven GP Super Clinic bid.

While allied health services have struggled for staff in the Central Highlands, director Meg Milne said the charity has managed to recruit and retain staff, “picking up the slack for government services” such as speech pathology where two Department of Education positions have remained vacant for three years.

“We’re very excited about the super clinic,” Ms Milne said.

“Our allied health professionals, a lot of them are new graduates and we’d like to think they’re all supportive.”

Ms Milne said taking rooms at the super clinic would mean more services could be offered to cut down a two-year waiting list.

“We do zero to 12 years old and no one gets excited about kids having ADHD and behavioural issues,” she said.

“It’s not sexy, it’s not glamorous if it’s not acute care, but if we can get in and provide good quality early intervention, that can change some of those children and their family’s lives forever.”


Help shape the future of the arts

Help shape the future of the arts

Have your say on the future of the arts in the Central Highlands.

Five things to do in the region

Five things to do in the region

Five things to do in the Central Highlands.

Old England set to hit the region

Old England set to hit the region

Life and humour of old England lands in Central Highlands.

Local Partners