COURAGE AND KINDNESS: An armed services representative says kindness and tolerance are as Australian as the Anzacs
COURAGE AND KINDNESS: An armed services representative says kindness and tolerance are as Australian as the Anzacs Jacob Carson

Kindness and tolerance: Is this the best Anzac speech ever?

IT TAKES courage to care for others, as the Anacs showed when they risked death to save their wounded comrades.

Now an armed services representative says it's time to recognise indigenous Australiuns, and to show the courage we need to build a tolerant, diverse and caring Australia.

In a plea for compassion and tolerance, service representative, Wing Commander John Herlihy said caring for your mates and tolerating diversity are Anzac Day values, in addition to courage and determination.

Here is the full text of his official and moving address in Gympie Memorial Park at the Gympie Citizen's Meeting, Anzac Day 2017:

IT TAKES courage to care for others, as the Anacs showed when they risked death to save their wounded comrades.

Now an armed services representative says it's time to recognise indigenous Australiuns, and to show the courage we need to build a tolerant, diverse and caring Australia.

In a plea for compassion and tolerance, service representative, Wing Commander John Herlihy told the crowd in Gympie's Memorial Park that caring for your mates and tolerating diversity are Anzac Day values, in addition to courage and determination.

Here is the full text of his moving address in Gympie Memorial Park on Anzac Day, 2017:

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"Today we commemorate those men and women who have given their lives to defend the freedom that we all enjoy in this country.

We acknowledge all our ex-serving men and woman particularly those who have been injured either physically or psychologically by the trauma of conflict

We must also acknowledge our indigeneous brohers-in-arms who served so unstintingly but have yet to be recognised for their sacrifice.

You will all be aware that Anzac day originated on 25 April 1915 when Australian and New Zealand troops stormed the pre-dawn beaches at Gallipoli. the subsequent battle took a terrible toll with nearly 36,000 Anzacs killed or wounded, many of them teenagers like the young men and women here today. despite overwhelming odds they held their ground through courage, perseverance, determination, self-reliance and above all mateship.

These characteristics didn't just suddenly appear at Gallipoli. they were a part of the Australian character, forged by a hard land and a young nation and a need to rely on each other in hard time.

But Gallipoli showed the world that Australians were made of sterner stuff, strong, determined and courageous. Gallipoli showed what Australians already knew - we look after one another.

Before 1901, the year of federation, Australia was a collection of British colonies. in 1915, this fledgling nation was still a country of huge spaces and sparse population. a population considered to be ill disciplined and uncultured by British peers. so when 16,000 Australian and New Zealand troops were sent ashore at Gallipoli on 25 April 1915, there was no expectation of anything other than a diversion for the enemy.

But the Anzacs fought with courage, determination and cohesion that was soon recognised all around the world. this was the first public and global display of a fundamental Australian characteristic - looking out for each other and looking after each other which is encapsulated in the word mateship.

On the beaches of Gallipoli and in every other conflict since, Australian men and women have earned a reputation for working together for a common goal.

So when we commemorate those who died at Gallipoli and all subsequent conflicts in which Anzacs have fought, we do not celebrate that terrible scourge that is war. we remember why we went to war and how we dealt with it. we remember that when the chips are down, Australians stand up.

We remember that Australians stick up for each other whether you were born here or immigrated, whether you speak English fluently or with an accent. we have all originated from immigrants.

In times of conflict, when a mate was injured and disabled, men took extraordinary risks under heavy enemy fire to bring them back to safety away from enemy fire. we hear of such stories time and again from Gallipoli and in every conflict since.

Sometimes, it takes great courage to look after those less fortunate than ourselves; to reach out to those who are different; to take care of the wounded, disabled and less able amongst us.

We cannot bring back those who gave their lives for Australia, but we can remember their sacrifice and continue to nurture those same unselfish qualities in ourselves and our young men and women."

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