Menu
Business

Landholders in an uphill battle

Independent candidate for Nanango and Kingaroy Concerned Citizens Group secretary John Dalton said after conducting a mapping survey of the area, it was clear only pockets of the area would be granted protection under the criteria.
Independent candidate for Nanango and Kingaroy Concerned Citizens Group secretary John Dalton said after conducting a mapping survey of the area, it was clear only pockets of the area would be granted protection under the criteria.

A GROUP of Kingaroy farmers has argued against the new Strategic Cropping Legislation and said it would not protect much of the land around them.

John Larsen, Allan Sommerfield and Keith Jessen have 171 years of farming experience at Kingaroy between them and believe one of the criteria behind the new legislation will pose a big problem for the majority of paddocks in their area.

To be eligible for the cropping protection, land has to fulfill one of eight criteria, one of which is not to have a slope exceed 5%.

Independent candidate for Nanango and Kingaroy Concerned Citizens Group secretary John Dalton said after conducting a mapping survey of the area, it was clear only pockets of the area would be granted protection under the criteria.

"Set at 5%, only isolated pockets of soil in the Kingaroy, Wooroolin and Memerambi area will get protection, and this creates significant areas between the protected paddocks for activity such as bauxite mining to be developed," Mr Dalton said.

"John Larsen, Keith Jessen and Allan Sommerfield will tell you that a paddock with 8% slope is equally as productive and strategically worth saving as one which is 5%.

"The only difference is a minor increase in the frequency of plough over contour banks, and the periodic need to maintain them."

Mr Dalton said by excluding land that is at an 8% slope or more means it would not be a priority to protect.

"If you extend this argument to its ultimate conclusion, you could also say that the Lockyer Valley floods, some areas use irrigation and the Granite Belt need hail netting, and hence none of them are the "best of the best" or worth protecting," Mr Dalton said.

"The real reason for not protecting these 8% paddock is probably one of administrative convenience.

"This is not a valid excuse when future food security is at risk."

Topics:  landholders


Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Region faces wild wind

DESTROYED: Half of the roof of the Moranbah home was ripped off from the 104km/h wind.

Moranbah residents say weather is worse than the cyclone.

Heroic rescue saves life

CLOSE CALL: Leslie Cruthers and Buddha at the spot the playful pup fell into the Nogoa River.

Kayakers rush to save dog walker clinging to riverbank.

National super star at age 13

Competing in Rotorua, New Zealand earlier this year.

Dingo local takes on international motocross competition.

Local Partners