VIDEO: Magpie saved by carers after wings illegally clipped

SVETLANA Mitin is about to spend the next year nursing a magpie back to health.

The Wildlife Rockhampton volunteer came across the bird, which was only a few months old, last month but with a clipped wing, the magpie was not about to take to the skies anytime soon.

Ms Mitin said the wing was extensively clipped and meant the magpie would not be able to fly until new feathers grew back, which could take up to 18 months.

"It had a cut wing, perfect cut, I probably couldn't do a better job myself," she said.

"Someone who did it knew what they were doing.

"It would have been a death sentence to the bird because it can't fly, it can't get away from predators and it's very vulnerable to cats and dogs.

"What the future holds for this one is long term in care."

She said Wildlife Rockhampton worked tirelessly to support the magpie and other animals in care but the bird was facing a tough road to recovery.

"Say three weeks is a good example (for a wild animal to be kept in captivity), by three weeks you can see how difficult it is to stay, by the end of week three they are going pretty much nuts in their head because it's a wild bird," she said.

"I certainly would hope it's like a holiday place for (the bird) because water is fresh daily, there are showers every morning and food is provided.

"Fingers crossed it will go okay but it feels really sad because it's not fair on that bird.

"It will be stressful because they are territorial so that little guy lost its territory, left its family behind, it doesn't know where it is or what's going to happen."

She said anybody who was having trouble with nuisance magpies should call the rescue service or authorities.

"This is not a nuisance magpie, it's a young lad barely out of the nest so why someone would clip its wing I have no idea," she said.

"Whoever did this they must remember they just signed a death sentence for the bird."

For more info

To report nuisance magpies visit the Department of Environment and Heritage Protection at

Magpies are a protected species under the Wildlife Act 1975. All native birds are protected under the Wildlife Act 1975 and there are serious penalties for taking, harassing or injuring native wildlife. It is illegal to kill birds, or to interfere with their nests containing eggs or young without a permit or authority. 

Topics:  animals birds magpie wildlife wildlife rockhampton

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