Morgan Griffin and Xavier Samuel in a scene from the movie Spin Out.
Morgan Griffin and Xavier Samuel in a scene from the movie Spin Out. Contributed

MOVIE REVIEW: Spin Out is as Aussie as it gets

GONE are the days where a cinema only had one screen, and with new movies coming out every Thursday often it is hard for Aussie movies to get up at your local cinema.

So when one comes along that is so unashamedly Australian, we all owe it to ourselves to go see it.

Such is the case with Spin Out, the new movie co-written and co-directed by Tim Ferguson, best known as a member of The Doug Anthony All-stars (if you don't know who they are then ask your mum or dad, kids).

Set around the annual Bachelor and Spinsters' Ball (B&S) in a country town we meet Billy (Xavier Samuel) and Lucy (Morgan Griffin), who have grown up together in a small, close-knit country town where they form one of the town's best ute driving teams.

When Billy takes one risky car stunt too far, Lucy declares she is moving to the city.

Amid the mayhem of the B&S Ball, Billy only has one night to wake up to his true feelings for his best friend.

Spin Out has fun with one of the great rural Aussie traditions in a politically correct world. Everyone from the bush has a story (or 10) about a B&S ball, and it is one of those things that you don't find anywhere else in the world.

In the first few minutes of Spin Out you are introduced to a range of characters with names like Boof, Podge, Shazza, Spike, Turps, Tubby and Rooter. There's even a dog called Knob that has some of the best scenes.

It's easy to dismiss these characters as stereotypes, and expect Spin Out to be lewd, crude and totally distasteful, But what the film does so well is wear its Aussie heart on its sleeve and not cross the line.

Yes there are drinking contests, the odd chunder, utes doing doughnuts, exploding dunnies and a few poo jokes, but it's all in the name of good fun and is suitable for a wide audience.

The young cast of actors give Spin Out their all, and it's clear that everyone is having a good time.

Even Queensland's Lincoln Lewis puts in a great turn as Sydneysider Nic, who looks down his nose at the country bumpkins until he realises that they aren't all that bad.

Spin Out is a comedy that might not leave you rolling in the aisles but it has heart and romance, which will please anyone from age 13 up.

While it has a wide appeal, it probably won't be remembered in the same sentimental way we all feel about The Castle but seriously, what movie could live up to that one?

In a world where Aussie films are shot, produced, distributed and marketed for less money than the billboard budget for Johnny Depp's latest flop, it's a little bit of Australia on the big screen that comes along very rarely, and for that reason alone it's a good way to spend an hour and a half.

If there's any criticism of Spin Out, then it's that you're waiting for one scene to leave you in fits of laughter that never arrives.

Spin Out really needs that extra hilarious moment like 'The Massage Scene' from Mike & Dave Need Wedding Dates, which left anyone who saw it giggling for days.

Spin Out isn't the LOL comedy it could have been but as a bit of harmless fun based around something as dinkum as Vegemite on toast, this is a little piece of Straya that we can all relate to.

 

Spin Out

Stars: Xavier Samuel, Morgan Griffin, Travis Jeffery, Christie Whelan-Browne, Brooke McClymont.

Directors: Tim Ferguson and Marc Gracie

Rating: M

Verdict: 2.5/5 stars


 


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