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Nut allergy linked to breastfeeding

CHILDREN who are only breastfed in the first six months of their life may face a higher chance of nut allergies, research from the Australian National University revealed on Thursday.

A survey of parents with young children in kindergarten found babies that were fed only breast milk for the first six months were one and half times more likely to develop a nut allergy.

ANU medical school Professor of General Practise Marjan Kljakovic said the survey results showed breast feeding alone did not appear to protect against nut allergies.

"Over time, health authorities' recommendations for infant feeding habits have changed, recommending complementary foods such as solids and formula be introduced later in life," Professor Kljakovic said.

The research contrasts with the World Health Organisation's recommendation that babies be breast fed exclusively for the first six months of the child's life.

Topics:  allergies breastfeeding nuts


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