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The one piece of data missing from the Census

Few who experienced it have probably forgotten this screen
Few who experienced it have probably forgotten this screen Nikki Todd

IT'S the data the Census team at the Australian Bureau of Statistics aren't so keen to see made public. 

The ABS has refused to say how many people, if any, will be fined for not filling out the 2016 Census.

But while the ABS has refused to rule out pursuing fines in the future we have been able to establish none have been issued to date. 

The most recent Census was one which was marred by controversy as the website where people were able to fill out  the survey crashed, on the night of August 9, 2016, inconveniencing thousands of Australians. 

However despite some experts saying the data would be useless in the wake of the bungle today we were told the average Australian is a 38-year-old married mum of two whose parents were both born in Australia. 

Once the data was released the ABS was asked how many of the widely publicised $180 a day fines it has issued to people who either failed or refused to fill out the Census.

But when asked today whether or not anyone has been fined the ABS was tight lipped. 

"The ABS continues to assess instances of non-response relating to the 2016 Census of Population and Housing to ensure that all individuals are provided the opportunity to complete their Census form. This is an ongoing process," A spokesman said.

"The ABS has no power to issue fines or prosecute any individual.

"In some cases, the ABS may refer an individual's case to the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions (CDPP).The decision to fine or prosecute any individual rests with the Director of Public Prosecutions.

"Twenty per cent fewer people refused to complete the 2016 Census compared to the 2011 Census. A large number of the people that initially refused have now completed their Census form.

"This work continues and the ABS is unable to comment on individual matters relating any refusal to complete the Census."

However while the ABS would not rule out issuing fines when the CDPP was contacted and asked if any cases had been referred to it, the response was clear. 

"To date the ABS has not referred any matters to our Office relating to the last Census," a spokesman said.

"The role of the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions is to prosecute offences against Commonwealth laws before the Courts.  Any penalty imposed, including any fine is a matter for the Courts."

A freedom of information request was filed with the ABS in an effort to establish what percentage of Australians filled out the Census and how many people could still face a fine. 

The new typical Australian is a 38-year-old married mum-of-two whose parents were both born in Australia, according to the census. Picture: Bianca De MarchiSource:News Corp Australia
The new typical Australian is a 38-year-old married mum-of-two whose parents were both born in Australia, according to the census. Picture: Bianca De MarchiSource:News Corp Australia

How the 'typical' Aussie has changed 

By Claire Bickers

MEET the new "typical" Australian - a 38-year-old married mum-of-two whose parents were both born in Australia.

She has English ancestors, finished high school, has a mortgage on a three-bedroom house and does up to 14 hours of housework a week - unlike the new "typical" Aussie bloke who does less than five hours housework a week.

The average Aussie male is 37 years old.

A snapshot of a typical Australian was captured in the 2016 Census and released for the first time today.

The data reveals how much Aussies have changed since the first Census was taken in 1911.

Australians have aged significantly and women now outnumber men but in 1911 the "typical" Australian was a 24-year-old man.

Although the 'typical' Australian has both parents born in Australia, in New South Wales, Victoria, and Western Australia the 'typical' Australian has at least one parent who was born overseas.

The data snapshot reveals the average migrant to Australia comes from England - although this differs between states.

New Zealand migrants appear to prefer Queensland, while in Victoria the 'typical' migrant was born in India and in NSW they were born in China.

Home ownership has changed over the past decade. In 2006, a typical Aussie owned their home outright.

Now they buying with a mortgage.

Trends differ across the states too; in NSW - where housing affordability is in the spotlight with the median Sydney house price topping $1.1 million - homes are typically owned outright.

In the NT, they're mostly rented.

 

The 'Typical' Australian

Female

Age 38

Married with two children

Born in Australia

Parents both born in Australia

Speaks English

Owns two cars

Lives in a three-bedroom house

Finished Year 12

Does up to 14 hours of housework a week

Source: Australian Bureau of Statistics

 

HOW THEY COMPARE STATE BY STATE

NSW

Unlike the 'typical' Australian, at least one of the typical person in NSW's parents was born overseas.

This has changed just over the past decade - in the 2006 and 2011 Census data showed the average person in NSW had both parents born in Australia.

But like the national data, the typical Aussie in NSW is a 38-year-old married mum of two.

She lives in a three-bedroom home - that she owns outright, unlike the typical Australian nationally - and does up to 14 hours of housework a week.

Ms NSW has two cars and finished Year 12.

A typical migrant to NSW has changed in the past decade. Ten years ago, the average migrant to the state was a 45-year-old English woman. Now, it is 44-year-old woman from China.

QUEENSLAND

Queenslanders are just as likely to rent as they are to own their own home these days.

Home ownership trends have changed in the state over the past decade - in 2011 most Queenslanders owned their home with a mortgage.

And the age of a typical Queenslander is two years older than it was a decade ago.

Now, a typical Queenslander is a 38-year-old married mum of two who lives in a three-bedroom house. Like typical Australians nationally, she does up to 14 hours of unpaid housework a week. And unlike the typical West Australian, Victorian and New South Welshman, the typical Queenslander parents both come from Australia.

 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

South Australians have an older population than the rest of Australia but women still outnumber men.

The typical person from SA is a married 40-year-old mum-of-two, who lives in a three-bedroom home that she owns with a mortgage.

Ten years ago, the typical person from SA was aged 38.

Home ownership trends have changed in the state over the past decade; ten years ago the typical South Australian owned their home outright.

Both of the 'typical' South Australian's parents were born in Australia, unlike in Victoria, WA and NSW.

 

VICTORIA

The southern state has younger population than most of Australia and most of the population has at least one parent born overseas.

The typical Victorian is now a 37-year-old mum-of-two.

She has an English background, is married, lives in a three-bedroom house and has two cars.

Like most states, home ownership trends have changed in Victoria. The typical Victorian now owns their home with a mortgage, compared to 2006 when they owned their home outright.

Victoria's migrant population has also changed since the start of the decade. Now, a typical migrant was born in India, while in 2011 the typical migrant would have been from England.

 

TASMANIA

THE 'south island' has the oldest population in Australia.

A typical Tasmania is a married 42-year-old mum-of-two of English descent. She lives in a three-bedroom house which she owns outright. The home ownership trend for the typical Tasmanian hasn't changed in the past decade, unlike most states.

Both of the 'typical' Tasmanian's parents were born in Australia, which is a characteristic shared with the 'typical' Australian.

 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

Apart from the Northern Territory, the west coast is the only place in Australia that men outnumber women, according to the 2016 Census data.

A 'typical' West Australian is a married 37-year-old man with two kids.

His family has a bigger home than most Australians - four bedrooms, not three - and does between four and 14 hours housework a week.

And like the rest of Australia, the family likely has two cars.

The typical West Australia was born in Australia and has English ancestry but unlike most of the country, at least one of their parents are likely to be born overseas.

West Aussies typically own their homes with a mortgage in a trend that remains unchanged over the past decade.

 

NORTHERN TERRITORY

The Northern Territory has the youngest population in Australia is more likely to rent than own a home.

Unlike most of Australia, a typical Territorian isn't married.

And the NT is the only place besides WA where men outnumber women.

The 2016 Census data shows the typical person from the NT is a 34-year-old man who was born in Australia.

He is likely to have a partner and two children, and the family is likely to live in a three-bedroom home with two cars.

Both of the 'typical' Territorian's parents were born in Australia, a characteristic shared with the 'typical' Australian.

 

ACT

A typical person from the nation's capital is married 35-year-old mum-of-two.

She's younger than the typical Australian.

But like most places in Australia, a typical person from the ACT lived in a three-bedroom home, has two cars and finished Year 12.

A typical person from the capital had both parents born in Australia and has English ancestry.

They are more likely to own a home with a mortgage, rather than rent.

Topics:  census data editors picks fines

News Corp Australia

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