Partial solar eclipse to be seen in CQ skies this morning

CENTRAL Queenslanders looking at the partial eclipse in the sky this morning are expected to have better views of the eclipse than their southern counterparts.

People living in northern Australia - basically anyone living north of a line drawn between Perth and Rockhampton - will see a partial solar eclipse as the mooon covers a fraction of the sun's disk on March 9.

The eclipse is set to start at 10.55am in Rockhampton and finish at 11.17am.

According to a report on The Conversation website, from northern and western Australia, it will be possible to see a partial solar eclipse, where the moon takes a bite out of the sun. Darwin will have the best view, with 50% of the sun's area hidden by the moon during maximum eclipse.

The Northern Territory and most of Western Australia, Queensland and parts of South Australia have the chance to see the partial solar eclipse. However, the further south you are, the less you'll see.

From Perth, a mere 1% of the sun's area will be blocked, while the eclipse is not visible at all from New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory, Victoria or Tasmania.

EARLIER: CENTRAL Queensland astronomy lovers are in for a treat this month with a partial solar eclipse set to appear in the skies.

People living in northern Australia - basically anyone living north of a line drawn between Perth and Rockhampton - will see a partial solar eclipse as the moon covers a fraction of the sun's disk on March 9.

The eclipse is set to start at 10.55am in Rockhampton and finish at 11.17am.

Sun gazers are advised to not look directly at the sun (causes damage to eyes) and to use special solar glasses or safe solar projection techniques to watch the eclipse.

But the partial solar eclipse isn't the only astronomical event set to excite CQ astronomy lovers.

On March 23, a penumbral (a partial shadow, as in an eclipse) eclipse of the moon will be occur.

This is where the moon glides through the outer segment of the shadow cast by Earth.

In contrast to a total or partial lunar eclipse, where the Moon is either fully  or partially immersed in Earth's shadow, star gazers will only see a subtle darkening of part of the moon's disk.

This eclipse is expected to start at 7.37pm AEST with mid eclipse set for 9.47pm and finishing at 11.57pm.

Also, yellow-hued Jupiter will be closest to Earth and at its brightest on March 8.

Read more about what star gazers can see in the skies in March here: Top astronomical events in March: eclipses, planets and constellations


Maternity unit safe

Maternity unit safe

Promising future for Emerald maternity services

Gemfest a 'huge party'

Gemfest a 'huge party'

Heart of event hasn't changed.

Hay runs delivering hope to CQ farmers

Hay runs delivering hope to CQ farmers

A Springsure local took to the road last Friday for a hay run.

Local Partners