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Police computer glitch factor in Luke Batty's death: chief

PROBLEMS with Victoria Police's IT systems could have contributed to the death of 11-year-old cricketer Luke Batty at Tyabb, it has been revealed.

Police admitted they missed an oportunity to arrest Luke's father Greg Anderson, 54, when he he was in contact with them three weeks ago.

Mr Anderson was shot by police when he threatened officers with a knife after he killed his son with a cricket bat on Wednesday night.

He had a history of mental illness and was known to police.

On Friday, Victoria Police Chief Commissioner Ken Lay said officers had spoken to Anderson about reports of assault allegations on January 27.

But they had not been aware that he already had five outstanding arrest warrants against him for domestic violence.

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Mr Lay said problems with the police IT system meant the officers would not have known about the warrants at the time.

"Our members who attended at that scene would not have had visibility of the existence of those warrants when they attended at this address because of shortcomings in our IT systems," he said.

Mr Lay said he was not saying the IT system was the sole cause of the problems.

Victorian police have launched an investigation into the way they handled the case.

Mr Lay said the review would run alongside several other probes into the incident, including a homicide squad inquiry, a police investigation into Luke's death, and a police ethical standards review into the police shooting.

Police have been dealing with complaints against Mr Anderson for at least a decade.

"It is my hope that Luke's death will be a very, very strong reminder to our community on the insidious and pervading nature of family violence,'' the police chief said.

"Hopefully it will be a watershed in improving the way we respond to these issues, for not only Victoria Police but the broader community."

"For the last decade, Rosie has been living in fear, tormented by the hands of a person who loved her. She's not alone," he said.

"She is one of thousands and thousands of women who live in similar circumstances in our state at the moment."

Topics:  cricket editors picks luke batty


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