OPPORTUNITY LOST: Clive Palmer speaking at the Institute of Sustainable Development and Architecture at Bond University.
OPPORTUNITY LOST: Clive Palmer speaking at the Institute of Sustainable Development and Architecture at Bond University. David Stuart Twebond

Red tape shackles tourism: Palmer

THE Gold Coast, Queensland and Australia are missing out on money from the expanding Chinese market due to unnecessary government hurdles, according to Queensland’s richest man, Clive Palmer.

He made the remarks at Bond University in a talk in which he criticised various tiers of government.

“There are so many hurdles which hold our country back from being, and achieving, what it could really achieve,” Mr Palmer said.

“There’s 10.5 million Chinese going to Hawaii and the west coast of the United States on holidays but very few are coming to the Gold Coast.

“And you’ve got to ask yourself, ‘why is that?’,” he said.

“Haven’t we got a good product in tourism to offer on the Gold Coast?”

Mr Palmer said bureaucratic hurdles were hurting other areas, and the Chinese were choosing to purchase an increasing amount of minerals from Brazil and South Africa instead of Australia, despite the longer distances.

He said bureaucracy hurt all kinds of development, and gave an example of a developer who had spent $28m on a $50m Queensland project.

He said environmental approval for the project had not come through after nine years.

“A lot of the reason why this is so, is because the government and people in authority won’t make decisions.

“It’s also our political leaders, our treasurers and economists don’t look at our whole economy and see what we could do,” Mr Palmer said.


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