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Research into turtle strandings

A Southern Cross University marine science student and a Dolphin Marine Magic veterinarian are trying to understand why turtles are stranding themselves.
A Southern Cross University marine science student and a Dolphin Marine Magic veterinarian are trying to understand why turtles are stranding themselves. Contributed Facebook

A FIRST-of-its-kind research project will look into the causes of sea turtle strandings and deaths from Yamba to Taree.

Southern Cross University marine science student Tegan Baker is working closely with Dolphin Marine Magic veterinarian Duan March to understand why turtles are stranding themselves; with a hope they can improve the situation.

Minnie Water, Brooms Head and Coffs Harbour have the highest number of strandings.

"When a turtle strands it usually means they are injured, sick or exhausted," Ms Baker said.

"We have five years of data, with 205 recorded turtle strandings along this part of the coast.

"Some of the turtles have obviously become entangled in fishing lines or been injured as a result of a boat strike, but for the vast majority of strandings there are no obvious injuries."

Previous investigations of strandings have so far drawn a blank.

Topics:  dolphin marine magic marine science sea turtles southern cross university


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