HOPEFULS: Paul Scarr, Susan McDonald, barista Joshua Stott, Member for Flynn Ken O'Dowd, Shelfield Coffee Brewers' owner Pete Jeon and Senator Matt Canavan.
HOPEFULS: Paul Scarr, Susan McDonald, barista Joshua Stott, Member for Flynn Ken O'Dowd, Shelfield Coffee Brewers' owner Pete Jeon and Senator Matt Canavan. Taylor Battersby

Senate candidates focus on the region

EARLIER this week, a pair of LNP senate candidates toured the Central Highlands to put their cases to CH voters.

Accompanied by sitting senator Matt Canavan, candidates Paul Scarr and Susan McDonald spoke about their passion for the area and its primary industries.

Mr Scarr, a former mining executive, had concerns about the anti-Adani movement and what it meant for the region.

"Adani, in good faith, has made a multi-million-dollar investment in this state and eight years later, they are still waiting on a final decision and the goal posts are still being shifted on it,” he said.

"That concerns me because of the jobs it will cost this region.”

Mr Scarr said it was important to bring "some facts” into the argument, particularly about coal fired power stations.

"Let's bring some facts into the argument rather than political rhetoric from the capital cities where they want to cost jobs in Central Queensland,” he said.

"You'd be mining some of the best coal in the world.

"The only question is whether it's (coal used in power stations) going to be coal which is mined in Queensland or coal which is mined in India or Indonesia or somewhere else, which is lower quality coal and dirty coal, which produces more emissions.”

Fellow senate hopeful Ms McDonald, a former chair of Beef Australia, also weighed in on the renewable energy debate.

"In Queensland, in the 1960s when we built coal fired power stations on coal fields, we had the cheapest energy prices in the land,” she said.

"Queensland, and particularly regional Queensland, flourished. It brought people and jobs and a certainty to the region.”

Ms McDonald said under Labor, an additional billion dollars of electrical costs had been pushed onto "mums and dads and small businesses across the state”.

"There are people who are having to chose between turning on their air-conditioning and buying food.

"That's outrageous in a state with such an abundance of resources, that government should cripple its own people.”

The former Brisbane meat merchant said electricity was also a "big issue” for the struggling beef industry.


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