The Proposal is hosted by Luke Jacobz.
The Proposal is hosted by Luke Jacobz.

Seven’s bizarre new dating show explained

If you can't be bothered tuning into The Bachelor for three months, then Channel 7's new ridiculous reality show might be for you.

The Proposal, which premiere's tonight at 8.30pm, is like watching The Bachelor on extreme fast-forward and promises viewers "a love story in an hour".

So how does it work?

In each episode, a male "suitor" or a female "suitress" is hidden behind a screen called "the commitment ring".

 

The suitress sits behind a screen so she can see the singles but they can’t see her. And yes, there’s a swimsuit round.
The suitress sits behind a screen so she can see the singles but they can’t see her. And yes, there’s a swimsuit round.

 

Eight singles are brought out on stage and the suitor/suitress can see them, but the singles can't see the person whose heart they're competing for.

Over four rounds (one of which encourages the singles to bare their bodies) the suitor/suitress whittles down the group of singles until there are just two left on stage.

The suitor/suitress then reveals themselves to the remaining singles for the first time, I repeat, the first time.

In the very next segment, there's a proposal. If it's an episode with a male suitor, he will then propose to one of the two female singles picked to remain on stage. If it's a female suitress, both male singles will propose to her and she will only accept one.

 

A single mum called Jess is the first suitress on The Proposal.
A single mum called Jess is the first suitress on The Proposal.

 

The Proposal promises a love story in an hour.
The Proposal promises a love story in an hour.

 

The one thing the show seems to assume is the singles, who have literally just laid eyes on the suitor/suitress for the first time, will be so taken by the person that they'll actually want to propose.

It's a pretty bold assumption, but the show's executive producer says the singles have every right to reject/refuse a proposal.

"The Proposal's aim is always to find and match suited couples who feel the time is right to find a partner for life and get engaged," Sean Kneale told news.com.au.

"However, all participants were advised that when they got to the proposal moment, they could either go for it or not. In fact, during the first couple of recordings we were very worried that we either wouldn't get a proposal or nobody would accept it."

 

Eight singles will battle it out for the affection of the male suitor.
Eight singles will battle it out for the affection of the male suitor.

 

The assumption the singles will just fall head over heels for the suitor/suitress also raised eyebrows when the US version of the show aired in the states last year.

As Esquire wrote about the show's concept, "It asks the viewer to simply accept that these people really are in love after seven-and-a-half minutes.

"The Proposal demands that viewers completely suspend their reasoning faculties, critical thinking skills and any expectation that what is happening on their TV screen might be real."

The Daily Beast added, "The Proposal is just a depressing reminder of how us single folk are expected to take any chance at love we can get - and it comes off more bleak than binge-worthy."

The US version of the show was cancelled after the first season due to poor ratings. The question remains; will Aussie viewers reject The Proposal too or will they fall madly in love?

The Proposal premieres tonight at 8.30pm on Channel 7


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