Survey investigates

A SURVEY investigating the social impact the mining industry has on resource-rich communities is currently underway in Queensland.

The study, headed by the Head of School of Justice, Professor Kerry Carrington, at the Queensland University of Technology in Brisbane, identified the lack of data available regarding the impact the mining industry has had on regional communities whose economies are largely dependant on the resource sector.

The team identified the lack of analytical information and assessment of how the organisational shifts in the mining industry sector are impacting on the local economy, employment, the provision of social services and recreational activities, housing, community safety, crime, and community lifestyle and wellbeing.

Prof Carrington secured the ethics approval and launched the survey last month, and said although the study has already received enough submissions to produce a detailed report, more submissions are being sought.

“The more respondents that are impacted by the resource and mining industry and complete the survey and submit their views, the better the report produced at the end will be,” Prof Carrington said.

“Participants have to be over-18 and work or live in a community impacted by mining development.”

She said the last decade has seen a marked change in the way the mining industry sourced its labour.

“Mining and energy projects operate continuously through production processes organised around 12-hour shifts increasingly reliant on non-resident labour accommodated in work camps or single person quarters,” she said.

“Many workers are travelling large distances to mining towns to work in new mining projects.”

To complete the survey, go to https://qutjustice.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_82McQUH2sn5wrVG.


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