The crowd at a previous Splendour in the Grass festival.
The crowd at a previous Splendour in the Grass festival. JAY CRONAN

Top tips for splendid time

Do prepare for the unexpected

FESTIVAL regulars know that weather at festivals can be temperamental at the best of times, so it's important to be prepared for rain, hail and shine all in one day.

That doesn't mean you need to lug large amounts of gear, but you do need to dress appropriately and maybe slip a poncho in your pocket before going in.

The last thing you want is to be trudging around the festival soaking wet and in thongs.

Do pace yourself

There's no point burning yourself out in the first couple of hours when you've got three days of solid partying to come.

Unfortunately this also means not writing yourself off on the first night unless you have an iron liver and can back up the next day.

Mark out the acts you most want to see and be prepared to miss those on your maybe list for the sake of convenience.

Drink plenty of water, wear sunscreen, make friends with St John's Ambulance in case of injury and double check you've packed the Beroccas.

Don't take a chair (unless you're camping)

Chairs at festivals are a massive no.

While it might seem nice to pull up a pew where ever you like, other festival-goers will hate you.

If you want to sit you'll need to wrestle someone for the always limited seating or alternatively you could always make use of perfect in-built cushion that comes pre-packaged with the human body.

Another good reason not to take a chair is that it's on the Splendour list of banned items.

Other banned items include glass, cans, alcohol, illegal drugs, skateboards, boogie boards (in case you planned on going for a quick surf while in the festival), weapons of any kind and animals.

Do organise meeting places throughout the day

Becoming separated from friends at festivals is part and parcel with the festival experience, however, if mobile towers go down you need to be prepared.

Mobile phone towers at last year's festival were overwhelmed by the amount of texting traffic, resulting in some festival-goers not receiving texts until days later.

We would suggest carrier pigeons but as we've already pointed out they're on the banned list.

The Northern Star has been told that Telstra and Optus have put in place measures to compensate with the extra texting traffic, however, if the towers do go down it's a good idea to have pre-planned places to meet throughout the day.

Do bulk-order the drink tickets

Let's face it you are at a festival, you're never going to buy too many drink tickets, so buy them in bulk.

Lining up to buy drinks takes enough time without also having to join the line for drink tickets. So don't waste music time on slow-moving lines.

Don't get trapped by toilet trauma

Everyone knows about lines for festival toilets and yet we still leave nature's call to the last second.

Somehow we expect that the copious amounts of fluids consumed (water of course) by the thousands of people throughout the festival won't result in mass marches for the toilet block.

So going early and not going at the end of a set is the key to beating the trauma of festival toilets.

Fellas stare straight and pray for no stage fright, the last thing you want is to go through it all again in the near future.

Do obey the rules

It's a bit of a downer but nothing will ruin your weekend more than copping a fine, so pay attention to the rules.

Police patrols and sniffer dogs will be present, so any illegal behaviour inside the event will be cracked down on.

Bryon Shire Council is also reminding everyone that no camping and alcohol free zones will be enforced during the festival.

Council's governance manager, Ralph James said he was hopeful that tourists would enjoy a busy weekend in Byron Shire while also respecting the bay.


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