Turnbull: we will make 'considered changes'

PRIME Minister Malcolm Turnbull has reaffirmed his commitment not to make policy changes on the run or without widespread consultation.

The issue was one of the main bugbears that plagued former prime minister Tony Abbott's time in the top job and contributed to his eventual downfall.

Mr Turnbull, in a wide-ranging interview on Sky News, said his elevation to the top job had already boosted business confidence.

"It means businesses are investing, they are hiring, people are getting jobs, they are making more money and paying more tax," he said.

"Here we are in a world where interest rates are as low as they have ever been and yet we do not have enough business confidence to promote investment.

"We have seen a rise in business confidence because we have a government talking confidently about our future and talking optimistically about our future."

Mr Turnbull said he would not go into the finer details about last week's leadership coup.

He would not confirm whether deputy Liberal leader Julie Bishop or then social services minister Scott Morrison were privy to his plans to challenge Tony Abbott for the leadership.

"I have made a practice of not talking about leadership issues before I was the leader and I am not going to talk about them after I have become the leader," he said.

"The decision to challenge was entirely mine."

Mr Turnbull said government policies would no doubt change, but he would not be making decisions on the run.

He said he would not put a timeframe on any policy changes as it would be irresponsible to do so without consultation.

"When we do make changes, we will do so in a considered way," he said.

"This is a Cabinet government.

"What I am not going to do is make changes, or foreshadow changes, sitting here with you."


Topics:  malcolm turnbull politics tony abbott

Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

Future of telecommunication

Kristy Sparrow from Better Internet for Rural, Regional and Remote Australia (BIRRR).

Survey allows rural Australians to voice their concerns.

Taking a national stand

NO WAY: Students from Year 8 created 'No Way' bullying posters to show bullying has no place at Emerald State High school.

Local high school raises awareness against bullying.

Inland Port announced

ECONOMIC BOOST: Federal Member for Flynn Ken O'Dowd makes the funding announcement at the Central Highlands Development Corporation's Economic Futures Forum on Monday.

Ken O'Dowd announced federal funding for two major projects.

Local Partners