CQUniversity president Nick Klomp said changed course fees could incentivise people to live and work in regional towns.
CQUniversity president Nick Klomp said changed course fees could incentivise people to live and work in regional towns.

University fee changes could help Highlands

THE Central Highlands stands to benefit, on balance, from higher education reform, the president of CQUniversity says.

Last week the Federal Government announced changes to university course fees, decreasing those of agriculture, science, and engineering degrees and increasing those of law and humanities.

CQUniversity vice-chancellor and president professor Nick Klomp said the reduced cost of some courses would remove barriers to university study for many regional Australians.

"Evidence shows that when people go to university in regions like the Central Highlands, they're more likely to stay in the regions after they graduate and become part of the regional workforce," he said.

"It's vital to the future of the regions that we - universities and government - do whatever we can to encourage regional students to study regionally.

"Reducing the cost of studying teaching, nursing, agriculture, health and engineering will make these courses more attractive to students from all walks of life, particularly people from the regions."

Professor Klomp said that despite some degrees costing more in the future, people should still follow their passions and career goals when applying to university.

"Australia has one of the best tertiary education systems in the world, and that includes the ability for most domestic undergraduate students to defer their fees until they are earning higher salaries," he said.

"If you're truly passionate about something - whether that's a career in law, business, science, carpentry or the creative arts - my advice is to follow that passion, as it's most likely to result in future career success."

The fee increases do not apply to current students.


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