Victims parents lash out

BLACKWATER parents are speaking out, after a family forced from town by bullying at Blackwater State High, hit the Herald headlines last week.

“I could rattle off a dozen families that are leaving town because of the problems at the school,” said the parent of one victim.

“After 22 years living in Blackwater, I have to leave my husband here and take my two younger children out of primary school and away from their friends, so that my Year 8 son can go to a school in Rockhampton.

“He has been bullied since starting Year 8. On the way to lessons, they’ll run into the back of him and knock him to the ground.

“In the toilets they picked him up and threw him into the urinal trough.

“We told him to use a cubicle instead but he said it didn’t make any difference - they just urinate over the cubicle walls and up against the door.

“The principal told me she would deal with the issue, but nothing ever happens.

“The bullies need to be punished to learn that this behaviour is not acceptable.

“There is absolutely no discipline there.”

The story is all too familiar for another Blackwater mum, who is also planning to move her family from town for the next school year.

“My Year 8 daughter has had tampons and even a dirty sanitary pad thrown at her in the girls’ toilets.

“She came home really upset.”

“I didn’t even call the high school then as I have done about previous incidents and nothing has ever been done.”

Unable to wait until the next school year, one mother moved her Year 8 daughter from the school to Marist College this term, after months of bullying.

“It got to the stage where my daughter didn’t even want to go to school anymore. She cried every day and began making up excuses that she was sick when she clearly wasn’t.

“She was just too frightened to go in. One girl told my daughter she would kill her with a pair of scissors. They threatened to cut off her ponytail and there were constant cruel remarks - that she was ugly, too skinny, and didn’t wear the right clothes.”

The mother, herself a school teacher, described an incident in which her daughter was punched in the back by a male student after tripping over his chair.

“The other student wasn’t even suspended. Kids at that school need stronger discipline and more structure,” she said.

“Bullies destroyed my daughter’s confidence, but now, thankfully, I have my child back. She loves every minute of school at Marist and there are no excuses and no tears.”

“I could rattle off a dozen families that are leaving town because of the problems at the school.”


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