SUPPORTING THE CAUSE: Midwife Jessica Grady and event organiser Sarah Jensen.
SUPPORTING THE CAUSE: Midwife Jessica Grady and event organiser Sarah Jensen. Taylor Battersby

Vital funds for kids

EVERY year, 3200 Australian families experience the sudden or unexpected death of a baby or child.

That's something that Red Nose, an Australian organisation dedicated to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), wants to stop.

One of the organisation's most successful initiates is Red Nose Day which is held every year on August 9.

So far, proceeds from Red Nose Days across the nation have raised $17 million for life-saving research and education.

Last week, Emerald Hospital contributed to that fund raising total for the first time when it held its first Red Nose Day.

Speaking on Friday at the event, organiser and midwife Sarah Jensen said everything had gone really well.

"I became a member of Red Nose a little while ago and they sent me an email last week (about Red Nose Day),” Ms Jensen said.

"I read the email and thought, 'Let's just have a Red Nose Day here'.”

Ms Jensen said she initially approached her line manager Annie Gronbek and then the event snowballed from there.

"It (the event) got a bit bigger then Ben Hur,” she said. "I went to my line manager and she approved it all to go ahead - she's been really supportive.

"All the midwives have been on board - they did the baking.” The community were also generous in supporting Emerald's Red Nose Day, Ms Jensen said, and donated gifts and prizes.

Ms Jensen hopes to hold an "even bigger and better” Red Nose Day next year.

  • See pages 6, 20 for more Red Nose Day coverage.

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