Major changes to NSW restrictions unlikely before June

There will be no changes to COVID-19 restrictions in NSW this week, despite the National Cabinet outlining a three-stage plan to begin lifting shutdown measures.

National Cabinet today agreed to a three-step plan to get the country going again, starting with the reopening of restaurants, cafes, and shopping centres.

Libraries, community centres, playgrounds, and boot camps would also reopen under stage one of the plan, with up to five visitors also allowed in a home at the one time.

But there'll be no changes in NSW in time for Mother's Day.

In a statement, Premier Gladys Berejiklian said NSW welcomed the framework for the further easing of restrictions endorsed today by the National Cabinet.

 

However, noted "there will be no further change to restrictions in NSW this week," she said.

"The NSW Government has already eased a number of restrictions listed under the first stage of the plan," she said.

"NSW will continue to keep our citizens updated on our path forward."

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian speaks to the media during a press conference in Sydney, Friday, May 8, 2020. (AAP Image/Bianca De Marchi) NO ARCHIVING
NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian speaks to the media during a press conference in Sydney, Friday, May 8, 2020. (AAP Image/Bianca De Marchi) NO ARCHIVING

 

The premier already announced at the start of the month that two adults and their dependent children can visit another household anywhere across the state.

Schools will also resume some face-to-face learning in NSW from May 11 and on- site property auctions and inspections are due to recommence from this weekend.

It is understood there'll be no substantial changes to lockdown measures in NSW before June.

 

FOUR NEW CASES IN NSW

NSW recorded four new COVID-19 cases on Friday - including one Newmarch House staff case previously confirmed by operators Anglicare - taking the state total to 3047.

Some 10 people are in intensive care in NSW while the state's death toll remains at 46.

Anglicare on Thursday evening confirmed it had agreed to new conditions imposed on the Newmarch House aged care home by the Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission, including the appointment of independent advisor Andrew Kinkade.

Some 32 staff members and 37 residents have contracted the virus to date. Newmarch also agreed to not admit any new residents "until it can demonstrate that the serious risk to care recipients at the service has been effectively addressed".

Manly morning activities at sunrise. Photo Jeremy Piper
Manly morning activities at sunrise. Photo Jeremy Piper

 

 

DOROTHY HENDERSON LODGE CLEARED

NSW Health has officially declared the COVID-19 outbreak at Dorothy

Henderson Lodge over, more than two months after the initial outbreak.

Six elderly residents died at the care home in Sydney's Macquarie Park

after the first outbreak on March 4.

An infected carer, a 50-year-old woman, had tested positive the day

before. The source of her infection has still not be detected.

It was the first case of untraced community transmission in Australia.

A small fishing boat passes by the Ruby Princess in the waters of Manila Bay. Picture: Getty
A small fishing boat passes by the Ruby Princess in the waters of Manila Bay. Picture: Getty

 

RUBY PRINCESS ARRIVES IN MANILA

Meanwhile, the Ruby Princess cruise ship - linked to more than 20 coronavirus deaths and 600 infections across Australia - arrived in Manila in the Philippines on Thursday after departing Port Kembla two weeks ago. A NSW special commission of inquiry into the ship's disembarkation in Sydney on March 19 will resume on Friday.

The NSW government on Friday also said more than 13,000 people to date have been placed into 14 days of mandatory hotel isolation after returning from overseas since late March.

Grants are available to help councils create more space for people to walk, cycle and exercise safely during the COVID-19 pandemic. Picture: Toby Zerna
Grants are available to help councils create more space for people to walk, cycle and exercise safely during the COVID-19 pandemic. Picture: Toby Zerna

 

CASH SPEND TO OPEN UP SPACE FOR PUBLIC

Some $15 million will be set aside by the NSW government to help councils provide more space for people to walk, cycle and exercise safely during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The plan, announced on Friday by NSW Planning Minister Rob Stokes, also includes an extension of George Street's car-free zone in Sydney's CBD, a new pedestrian- only boulevard on Liverpool's Railway Street and a "people's loop" in Parramatta Park.

Councils will have until June 10 to apply for grants of up to $100,000 for temporary projects such as widening footpaths and cycle lanes and up to $1 million for medium-term projects such as extra crossing points, wider kerbs and lower speed limit trials.

Mr Stokes said in a statement on Friday the COVID-19 pandemic had significantly increased the demand for easy and safe access to public spaces. "Whether it's new cycle lanes, pedestrian-only streets or wider footpaths, we're committed to working with councils and communities to fund projects that can make life better for everyone - both now and once the pandemic is over," Mr Stokes said in a statement.

Originally published as Watch and wait: Premier wary on rushing into PM's plan


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