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What's killing 400 Central Queenslanders a year?

Doctor.
Doctor. Contributed

EVERY day, three Central Queenslanders are diagnosed with cancer.

This is according to the latest statistics from the Cancer Council's Cancer Research Centre, which reveal cancer cases in Queensland have more than tripled over the past 32 years.

In Central Queensland, around 1200 people are diagnosed with cancer every year, with about 400 people dying from the disease.

Prostate cancer was the most common cancer diagnosed in Central Queensland, with around 220 local men are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year.

About 30 will die from the disease.

CC spokesperson Katie Clift said the top five most common cancers for Central Queensland men are prostate cancer, bowel cancer, melanoma, lung cancer and non-hodgkin lymphoma.

 

Katie Clift from Cancer Council Queensland.
Katie Clift from Cancer Council Queensland.

The top five most common cancers for Central Queensland women are breast cancer, melanoma, bowel cancer, lung cancer and uterine cancer.

"Bowel cancer is the second most common cancer in the region, with around 143 new cases diagnosed annually, followed by melanoma with 137 new cases, and lung cancer with 115 new cases," Ms Clift said.

"Lung cancer remains the region's biggest cancer killer, with around 90 locals dying from the disease each year.

"About 50 locals will die from bowel cancer every year, 30 from prostate cancer and about 24 from breast cancer."

The latest snapshot of cancer in Central Queensland shows across all cancer types, the average five-year relative survival rate is 67%.

At least a third of all cancer cases in Central Queensland could be prevented - around 400 cases every year.

"While survival rates are improving overall - we have the resources and information available to prevent at least one case of cancer every day in Central Queensland," Ms Clift said.

At the end of 2014, there were 91,020 Queenslanders alive who had been diagnosed with cancer in the previous five years.

"All Queenslanders should participate in recommended cancer screening, quit smoking, eat healthily, exercise, maintain a healthy weight, stay SunSmart and limit alcohol intake to reduce the risk of preventable cancers."

Topics:  cancer cancer council australia disease fatal


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