Marie Van Beers was allegedly murdered in her Tweed Heads unit in 2018. Photo: Facebook
Marie Van Beers was allegedly murdered in her Tweed Heads unit in 2018. Photo: Facebook

‘You don’t rule my life’: Killed woman to ex-partner

A PHONE recording between a Tweed Heads woman, who was fatally stabbed, and the man accused of killing reveals the pair had a troubling history together.

Paul Thomas Ryan, 66, is before a judge only trial for the murder of his ex-partner, 63-year-old Marie Van Beers, at the Lismore Supreme Court.

He has pleaded not guilty to the murder charge but pleaded guilty to manslaughter.

The Crown Prosecution has ultimately rejected his manslaughter plea.

Mr Ryan is accused of fatally stabbing Ms Van Beers in their Brett St unit, Tweed Heads, on November 12, 2018.

The pair, who had been together for 37-years, had separated about two years before Ms Van Beers' death but continued to live together, the court heard.

Mr Ryan's defence barrister, Jason Watts, said his client's long sustained alcoholism had contributed to his ability to control himself at the time of the killing.

Ms Van Beers had successfully taken out an apprehended violence order against Mr Ryan the day of her death.

 

Marie Van Beers, 63, who was killed at Tweed Heads in 2018. Picture: supplied
Marie Van Beers, 63, who was killed at Tweed Heads in 2018. Picture: supplied

 

The court has heard she intended to relocate to Taree the next day to find new accommodation and be with her new partner.

A recording of a phone conversation between Ms Van Beers and Mr Ryan was played before the court on Friday.

The pair can be heard disagreeing about Ms Van Beers' having started a new relationship despite being separated from Mr Ryan for almost two years.

Mr Ryan can be heard in the recording telling Ms Van Beers they would be "getting back together".

"I'm going to hit your f -king face, you're not going to go anywhere f -king near him."

Ms Van Beers can then be heard explaining she had no intention on rebuilding her relationship with Mr Ryan.

"You don't rule my life," she said.

"You told me you don't want anything to do with me … after someone has been near me.

"I don't have to have to have your permission to do anything, you lost that right a couple of years.

"I always stood by you, I always made sure you had your bloody cans … I always made sure you had clean clothes … I always made sure you got what you need except me because you didn't want me.

"You've made me feel like a worthless piece of s -t.

"What I do with my life has nothing to do with you while you get yourself on the road to recovery."

Ms Van Beers can then be heard speaking over Mr Ryan's protests that he still loves her.

"I know you love me, but you don't want me, you just want me to provide you your everyday things," she said.

"You can't even turn on a TV and use the remote without me.

"I've enabled you all this time, it's time for you to man up and look after your f -king self.

"I love you because you're the father of my children, but I don't care."

Neighbours of the pair also gave evidence on Friday before the court, explaining they had witnessed Mr Ryan burning "woman's clothes" in a bin out the back of the block of units he lived in.

This incident allegedly happened a few weeks before Ms Van Beers died, while she was away visiting her new partner.

The trial will continue on Tuesday in the Lismore Supreme Court.

*For 24-hour domestic violence support call the national hotline 1800RESPECT on 1800 737 732 or MensLine on 1800 600 636. 

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