Emerald tuba player Drew Ferguson with conductor Ralph Hultgren at Griffith University's Queensland Conservatorium of Music State Honours Ensemble Program (SHEP) Queensland.
Emerald tuba player Drew Ferguson with conductor Ralph Hultgren at Griffith University's Queensland Conservatorium of Music State Honours Ensemble Program (SHEP) Queensland.

Young CQ musician performed alongside the state’s best

EMERALD tuba player Drew Ferguson has joined Queensland’s best young instrumentalists at Griffith University’s Queensland Conservatorium of Music State Honours Ensemble Program (SHEP) Queensland recently.

Drew travelled to Brisbane to attend the four-day program, which culminated in a performance at the Conservatorium Theatre.

SHEP is an educational program for music students that helps extend and encourage their pursuit of musical excellence.

It is the second time Drew has been selected for SHEP Queensland, after attending last year’s program. He also performed at SHEP Capricornia, at Rockhampton, earlier this year.

Emerald tuba player Drew Ferguson has joined Queensland's best young instrumentalists at Griffith University's Queensland Conservatorium of Music State Honours Ensemble Program (SHEP).
Emerald tuba player Drew Ferguson has joined Queensland's best young instrumentalists at Griffith University's Queensland Conservatorium of Music State Honours Ensemble Program (SHEP).

As a member of the Graham Lloyd Wind Orchestra, Drew worked with eminent Australian composer and conductor Ralph Hultgren.

Their final performance included the world premiere of ‘Drop, Drop Slow Tears’, composed by Mr Hultgren especially for the occasion.

“Participating at SHEP Queensland allows me to push my musical abilities to the next level,” Drew said.

“It gives me the opportunity to work with conductors like Ralph Hultgren and perform alongside some of the best young musicians from throughout the state.

“I am currently the only tuba player in the Marist College bands and the Emerald Town Band, so performing alongside other tuba players is also an invaluable experience.

“Although this year was a little different, due to COVID-19 restrictions that meant there was no audience at the final performance, I still gained a lot from attending.”

Despite only playing the tuba for the past two years, Drew has his sights set firmly on a career in music. He also plays the trombone and bass trombone.

“The buzz of performing, even if it’s to an empty theatre, is indescribable and I’m very excited to be given opportunities like SHEP Queensland. Thanks to my music teachers for getting me to this level of performance.”


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